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Overall School Rating
39 Ratings

4 out of 5 Stars

24
2 Stars
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1 Star
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9 Student Reviews (3 star). See all 39 reviews.

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2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

We have to complete the Diversified Education Curriculum as the core requirement. The pre-medical coursework is not a major by itself, but completed along side the major coursework. It is difficult because the class sizes are large and the exams can be tough as well. However, there are online quizzes that can help you learn the material. There are also echo360 recordings for the large lecture science classes which make reviewing for the classes more feasible. There are many research opportunities on and off campus, but you have to look for them. The study abroad programs are amazing.

Quality of Life

Everything is expensive, but campus life is pretty nice. I love meeting new people and being able to stay out late on campus. This allows me to take part in more club and organization activities. I am also about to be a part of the residential hall council as well. I've never felt unsafe on campus, but I know the RSP service is very good - I've walked with them once and they are friendly and keep you awake while walking back to your dorm. The life is great, but you have to be careful not to let the plethora of student clubs and fun activities take all of your time; make sure you study.

Admissions

I followed the Common Application and submitted a supplementary essay.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2013

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

I have little experience with general requirements, called DECs (Diversified Education Curriculum), as I am exempt from nearly all of them as an Honors College student. My impressions from other non Honors students is that they sometimes encourage students to broaden their horizons and give them an opportunity to learn about something interesting outside of their major, but more often than not, they are just tedious and a bit annoying, as the list of requirements is quite long. Some DECs can be replaced by AP credits, but many cannot.

Academic advising is, in my experience, very poor. Some resources are available but they are not well advertised and make very little effort to reach out to students--if you want help, you have to search for it. My experience with the advisors within my major has been quite good--they are generally responsive, concerned and quite helpful--but I'm not sure whether this is true across the board.

Class sizes, class quality, and the accessibility of professors all vary greatly across the board, depending on the course, its popularity, and the professor. In large lectures, which may have upwards of 500 students, a respectable effort is made to provide more personalized attention in recitation sections, which are held weekly and conducted by graduate students. In smaller classes, professors tend to be much more approachable and most make an effort to connect with students. There are a wealth of opportunities for students to get involved with research, and contacting professors is the best way to do so.

Grading also varies from one class to another, but I have found that most teachers will curve the class at the end of a semester. I have never felt a grade was unfair, but many of my classes have been challenging, and these are the ones I find most fulfilling. The workload is usually very doable, but easily adjusted based on a student's credit load for the semester.

Finally, study abroad opportunities are abundant and encouraged, and the International Academic Programs office staff are quite friendly and helpful. For many programs, financial aid can be applied toward international study and tuition is paid to SBU, so it is an opportunity accessible to many students.

Quality of Life

Housing facilities are generally quite nice and are well maintained--those that are not are usually the older dorm buildings. The recent construction of a large new housing complex has eased the space constraints and significantly lowered the number of students who are tripled in double rooms. The campus is expansive and somewhat divided according to quad--in my opinion, each residential quad seems to have a characteristic demographic that remains fairly constant. Recreational facilities are limited--the residential fitness centers are very small and have limited hours.

The food provided by campus dining usually ranges from satisfactory to excellent, with some of the highlights being fresh sushi and a Starbucks on campus. The prices are high, but having a meal plan exempts students from paying tax on food. All of the dining halls are food court style, and food is purchased a la carte--there are no all-you-can-eat locations. Limited hours in some locations can be frustrating, as can the distance between the various parts of campus, particularly in the winter. However, overall, I think that the dining program rates better at Stony Brook than a majority of other schools.

Campus life tends to dwindle on the weekends--many students commute or go home from Friday to Sunday, so things can be kind of dead. However, those who remain tend to form a network within their residential quads for socializing. There is very little crime on campus, and I have never felt unsafe. There are many programs in place to protect students, including the blue-light phones, ride program, and Resident Safety Patrol, and there is a fairly strong police presence on campus. Police never harass students--they generally only interfere to prevent vandalism. There is also a strong drug and alcohol presence on campus, but while accessibility is very high, peer pressure is generally low. Substances are readily available to those who seek them, but it is not necessarily and expectation or a requirement.

The overall happiness of students is generally low, which contrasts with my own personal feelings. I like my university very much, but I admit that there is a strong sense of student apathy about student government, recreational programs, and the college experience in general. Many people seem to be unsatisfied with what the university offers them, but unmotivated to promote any changes.

Admissions

The regular application process utilizes the Common Application and requires one personal statement and two letters of recommendation. The application for the Honors College is the same, but with one additional essay. There is currently no early action/early decision program in place, and, to my knowledge, no interviews are conducted.

Financial aid is determined according to the FAFSA, which all students must complete, and all accepted students are automatically considered for a panel of university scholarships. There is a small selection of additional scholarship opportunities with specific qualification criteria--information and applications for these are available on the financial aid website.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2013

2010VERIFIED STUDENT
Admissions

I think I either did the common application or a specific Stony Brook application. I received NO financial aid, scholarships, nothing. Normal, standard application.

Level

4

Graduation Year

2011

2010VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Core classes (DEC system) is antiquated and needs to be re-done. Way too many classes to take. I thought academic advising was hard to maneuver, and difficult to get answers. You have to teach yourself everything if you want to learn.

Quality of Life

Housing options, library, dining, walking services all very good.

Admissions

General SUNY application. Not sure about anything else because I was a transfer student so we have different processes. No scholarship opportunities. Financial Aid app separate

Level

5

Graduation Year

2011

2010VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

lots of classes to choose from.

most classes are hard and challenging, but worthwhile.

outstanding academic advising.

classes are too big, the professor would not know who you are unless you go to office hour.

very competitive

fair grading

Quality of Life

Great overall

food is a little too expensive

Admissions

Common Application (the SUNY Application), financial aid

Level

4

Graduation Year

2011

2010VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

They are great if you know how to teach yourself. Many professors, specifically in the science field, don't seem to care about teaching their classes. I feel that they just want to do their research and are obligated to teach us so they have to.

Quality of Life

Cost of living is somewhat high but, I love being on campus.

Admissions

The Common Application makes applying easy and there are financial aid opportunities but, getting a scholarship is very difficult.

Level

2

Graduation Year

2013

2010VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Tough cause large class size, competing against very brilliant people who should be in IVY leagues if it weren't for money. International students are very bright too.

Quality of Life

good

Admissions

Straight forward just like any other schools. Essays needed, letters of recomendation etc.

Level

4

Graduation Year

2011

2010VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

our classes are very challenging. this includes anytthing from science to psychology and even DEC courses. class sizes can be quite big but we do have a larger population. advising during the school yr can get better and more helpful.

Quality of Life

its good

Admissions

i dont remember but i know there was an essay plus you need a good SAT score along we with gpa. we are starting to have an increase of students applying and i believe we accept about 30 or 40%.

Level

4

Graduation Year

2011

2010VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Sciences are strong. Everything else is slanted radical left

Quality of Life

Dead on the weekends. Students hate it there. They try a little for some school spirit but no one cares and it's more annoying than anything. Professors don't speak English and are all far-leftists.

Admissions

standard app. with essay

Level

2

Graduation Year

2013

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