Skip to Main Content

Johns Hopkins University

Overall School Rating
124 Ratings

4.5 out of 5 Stars

57
63
1 Star
0

63 Student Reviews (4 star). See all 124 reviews.

Sort by

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

No university requirements outside of distribution credits. Majors will list specific courses though plus a list of electives to choose from.

Admissions

Common application, optional interview, additional essay on "Why do you want to go to Hopkins?"

Level

3

Graduation Year

2013

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Admissions

Common App with a supplement (one or two more essays);

optional interview (I didn't have one);

it is possible to apply early decision or regular decision (I applied regular decision);

Level

2

Graduation Year

2014

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Hopkins is unique in that there are no core classes. THere are distribution classes in which the student can take any class of interest outside of their major instead of being restricted to taking a specific class. Because of distribution credits, many students can double major and/or minor like I am currently doing.

Quality of Life

The campus is beautiful! Even though Hopkins is in the city, it has all the benefits of being in a city while still having a campus feel by being far enough away from downtown. There is also the "beach" which students hang out on when the warm Baltimore sun is shining.

Admissions

The process includes taking either the SATs or the ACTs. Three SAT IIs are also highly encouraged. The interview is also unique by Hopkins getting to learn more about the student in a relaxed atmosphere. The student is able to have any of their questions answered while talking to an undergraduate student.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2013

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Academics at JHU are top-notch. Although JHU is known for excellence in pre-medical, natural sciences, public health, biomedical engineering, and many other engineering disciplines, it's international studies major is the second largest on campus and is highly regarded. The university also has widely respected programs for majors such as art history, economics, writing seminars, romance languages, and a variety of other courses of study. There is no core curriculum, so students have a lot of academic freedom, which is fantastic. That being said, there are distribution requirements to ensure that students do get a firm liberal arts foundation for their education, so 12 credits (usually, four classes) are required outside the major coding. Roughly 2/3 of classes are under 20 students and the university has a 12:1 student to teach ratio. All professors are required to hold office hours and most are widely available to meet or converse over email if a student cannot make them. As for study abroad, an increasingly large number of students choose to do so; a well-staffed office helps students to go nearly anywhere, either on Hopkins sponsored programs, ones sponsored by other universities, or through direct enrollment programs. Finally, as its reputation suggests, JHU is a competitive place. Students and faculty are incredibly intelligent, hard workers, and like to push themselves. However, myths about students being cutthroat and out to get each other are simply false. Students like to challenge themselves to do better, not hurt others.

Quality of Life

Student life has improved every year I have been on campus. Housing is getting better, but there is still more work to do. Having freshmen split between physically on campus and across the street is a major problem with no near-term future in sight. That being said, there is about to be a major three-year overhaul of North Charles Street, which should make the major border of campus much safer, more walkable, and more beautiful. Crime and safety is an issue that has yet to be fully resolved. While the area is free from most types of violent crime, there are major cases of muggins (sometimes with a weapon) and break-ins. Facilities continue to improve. There is a brand new library that should be completed in just over a year and a new engineering building that will be breaking ground soon. Finally, perhaps the biggest draw is the cost of living, which is very cheap.

Admissions

Johns Hopkins University is a very selective university. It offers both ED and RD programs and accepts both the Common and Universal Application. JHU asks for a supplemental form to be completed when using either the Common or Universal Application. Financial aid is available, though with a tuition of over $50,000 it is still not enough to ensure that all students, regardless of need, will be able to attend the university. Interviews are not required, but essays do matter when reviewing a student's application.

Graduation Year

2011

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Each program has its own rigorous requirements. Most programs have a spelled out list of major requirements that you are expected to take as you progress: 100 level freshman year, 200 sophomore, etc. There are general requirements and technical electives that allow you to pursue your interests as well as specialize or minor in a different area of study. Hopkins allows undergraduate students to conduct their own research under the guidance of any professor for credit or pay, which I began taking advantage of at the start of my sophomore year. There are many notable faculty and professors to approach, but it is much easier to approach a professor you have had for a course or whose research interests you.

Study abroad was difficult, though not impossible, in my major; but I know many people with less structured curriculum that thrived abroad.

The workload is intense; but I enjoyed the company and the material/projects intrigued me.

Quality of Life

You really need to have personal drive to attend Hopkins, or the snowy days when everyone seems locked away in the library can get particularly dreary. Housing freshman year encouraged class bonding, and after that it's up to the students where and with whom they live. I recommend joining a fun/social group to keep you at least somewhat engaged with society. It's easy to get lost in the work that beguiles all Hopkins students who strive to "beat the curve."

Admissions

Common application, with required unique essay question: "What would you do with $10?" (when $10 was something.... I hear they ask "with the money in your pocket" now).

I applied regular decision, and was ultimately deciding between UC Berkeley and the Johns Hopkins University. I accidentally fell in love with the school upon visiting. By accidentally, I mean I had honestly decided to go to Cal; but the visit during "Discovery Days" and the small town atmosphere drew me to Hopkins. They offered great scholarships for scholars and minorities at both schools.

Graduation Year

2011

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Distribution requirements, but no core curriculum. Depending on major, distribution requirements change. Engineering students are assigned an academic advisor within their own department. We are required to have each semester's schedule approved by them. Class sizes are small, and professors are very accessible and research opportunites are numerous. Classes are competitive, taught by noted faculty, and are usually graded with a curve. Study abroad for engineers is difficult, but can be done over summer (with help of the Vredenburg Scholarship) or during the semester (either by only having a semester of distribution classes or studying at an actual engineering school such as the Indian Institute of Technology). Workload is pretty intense, but manageable.

Quality of Life

Quality of life is pretty great, with lots of interaction (mainly in the library) and opportunities to be involved in the community. Baltimore has some amazing places to eat, and the campus food is great too! Cost of living is middling, and overall happiness of the school is fairly high. There are some bad section of the city, but you learn where to not go. Campus security is amazing.

Admissions

Common Application with unique essay questions, an optional interview, and the possibility of early decision.

Level

4

Graduation Year

2012

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

No core classes which is great, major requirements aren't too time consuming, there are a plethora of advisors (one for each program you're in and one for the school you're in. Most classes are lectures, but professors are incredible and very accessible. Research is extremely easy to come by. JHU is very competitive, with a large workload for all students.

Quality of Life

Everything is great, but the cost of housing and meal plans are way too high. There is no sympathy for those who need financial help (more than their financial package grants).

Admissions

Common App was used, early decision was available although I did not apply ED. Interview not required, and I did not have one.

Level

2

Graduation Year

2014

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Academics here are extremely rigorous. Faculty push students to work harder than they thought they could. Class sizes are small, so students really do get individualized attention from professors. There are lots of research opportunities and if you express interest in a certain area, it is really easy to get those internships or research opportunities. There is no core curriculum, so there are no specific classes you have to take. However, if you are an engineer/ natural sciences/ math major, you have to take a certain number of humanities and social sciences classes and vice versa. Most of those requirements are knocked out by AP credits and you can take them pass/fail if you want (up to one class pass fail each semester). There are a lot of study abroad opportunities, even for pre-med and engineers.

Admissions

I believe it was common application with an optional supplement, but I don't remember. Interviews are optional. both early decision and regular decision are offered.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2012

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Hopkins works on a distribution credit system, so you're getting the liberal arts well rounded education in that you are required to take classes in multiple fields (natural science, engineering, social science, humanities, and quantitavie/math) but unlike general requirements or core classes, JHU does not dictate exactly what classes you must take. This is nice because you get to take the classes you're interested in and classes that are at the level of mastery you hold in each area (i.e. writing sems majors don't have to take the same physics class as biophysics majors...yikes!). The majority of students at Hopkins participate in research and it is readily accessible, even as a freshmen. It is one of the defining aspects of Hopkins as opposed to other liberal arts universities and I think that students enjoy the chance to apply theories learned in the classroom to real life, which is of course entirely possible through research. What is great is that you can join a professor's research project that is already under way or you can easily apply for grants to conduct your own research, whatever floats your boat. I studied abroad twice, loved both experiences, and Hopkins was great about enabling me to do so. They make sure all of your credits will transfer before hand so that you're not on a program that is incompatible with the school, and the distribution credit system makes is much easier to travel abroad without having to cram courses into other semesters or take them during the summer in order to graduate in 4 years. Another great feature about Hopkins is that you have covered grades during Freshman fall semester, so that you transcript only reads as pass/fail. This give students time to adjust to college academics as well as finding the balance between all of the different activities and demands of a college student. I will never lie and say that Hopkins hands out easy A's all over the place...you definitely have to work for your grades. That being said though, it's possible to do well and it's also possible to manage your classes but still have time for other things and for having fun. Will you sometimes have a stressful week? Yeah, but that's called midterms and they happen at pretty much every college in the country, so we're not the only ones in that boat. As for professors, they love interacting with students, you just have to decide that you're going to take the first step to contacting them. They all have office hours and are super hospitable, they're just not going to reach out to each student individually (hey, they're busy people too!). But, show up to office hours or shoot them an email and bam, they're there to help. I cannot tell you how invaluable developing personal relationships with professors was to my academic success, as well as just bolstering my interest in the material. Class sizes are so variable that I just don't really fell like broaching that subject because my fingers are alredy tired of typing.

Quality of Life

We are an "urban oasis." One of my favorite things (among the many) about Hopkins is that we are in an urban setting (the great city of Baltimore), but we have a true campus, with green spaces and everything. It strikes the perfect balance between all that a city has to offer (restaurants, music, clubs, festivals, etc.), with the sense of community that a college offers. More over, we can easily access Washington DC, which is great for people interested in INternational Relations (the 2nd most popular major at JHU) or politics not to mention its just a nice city to visit when you want a change of scenery. Is there crime in Baltimore? Yeah (I mean, there was a show called 'The Wire,' maybe you've heard of it?) But really, the dangerous areas aren't where Hopkins is and you have no reason to be in those areas anyways. So use the same commonsense that you would demonstrate living in any city and you should be pretty alright. Hopkins does alot to continually improve security and I can't really complain.

Admissions

JHU accepts the Common Application and the Universal Application. It doesn't have its own individual app, but does have a required supplement (2 short essays I believe) to the common and universal apps. The early decision (i.e. binding) deadline is Nov. 1 and you hear back Dec. 15. The regular decision deadline is Jan 1 and you hear back April 1. Interviews are offered by trained upperclassmen on campus and by alumni throughout the country and internationally. Mostly, the interviews are for the applicants to find out about the school and for students to share a little bit about themselves (especially stuff that might not come through in a paper application), but the interview is not intended to be heavily evaluative of applicants. There is one merit scholarship that all students are considered for simply by applying to the school and beyond that there are multiple scholarships and grants that do consider demonstrated need.

Graduation Year

2011

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

No core curriculum, freshman year advisor is assigned alphabetically (except for engineers), get faculty advisor once you declare a major, 12:1 student to teacher ratio, extensive research opportunities, three campuses abroad, heavy workload, not too competitive. Multiple Nobel laureates among faculty.

Quality of Life

Good dining options, including vegetarian and kosher - there is a year-round farmer's market within walking distance of campus, very safe campus, interesting neighborhoods immediately surrounding campus, happiness is medium - lots of activities but must have very good time management in order to do well in school and participate in activities, small community feel with research university opportunities.

Admissions

Early decision, common app, few scholarship opportunities, very minimal financial aid (packages are not very good when compared to other universities of the same caliber) - this excludes a large number of qualified students from being able to attend this university.

Graduation Year

2011

“”
Uppers Downers Comments Would You Recommend

Academics Quality of Life Admissions Level Graduation Year