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Overall School Rating
84 Ratings

4 out of 5 Stars

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55 Student Reviews (4 star). See all 84 reviews.

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2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Class sizes are small (25 students maximum). Professors are very accessbile and are devoted to their students success. Workload is daunting at times given the "one course at a time" class schedule. You cannot fall behind because once you do you can never catch up. It's very fast paced.

Quality of Life

It is a historic campus so things are somewhat lacking. Additionally, the town that the school is in is rather small so social life is lacking as well. But the town is extremely safe and I never felt unsafe walking home late at night.

Admissions

Great scholarship opportunities that make it more than affordable.

Graduation Year

2007

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Admissions

Common application, lots of merit scholarships

Level

2

Graduation Year

2013

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Great classes and student to faculty ratio

Admissions

Application, no interviews.

Graduation Year

2009

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

The One Course At A Time program made it possible for me to double major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) and Ethnic Studies while minoring in Psychology. My advisor was wonderful and I really appreciated the small class sizes. I wanted to go to a college that recognized me as a person and not simply a number on the class roster. Accessibility of professors and research opportunities were phenomenal. I actually wanted to study off campus and was able to utilize the Dimensions and Fellowships programs in order to better my experiences and application for medical school.

Quality of Life

The campus was really nice and I understand the appeal of having a residential campus; however, having other options for housing would be beneficial. It was a rough transition into paying rent and bills after being pampered with dorm living. Overall, I love the Mount Vernon area and never felt unsafe. Our library was great, but the hours are limited (especially on the weekend).

Admissions

I had a great relationship with the admissions department. I was able to email, instant message, or call my admissions rep. She even was the one to call and let me know that I was accepted and had received the prestigious William Fletcher King scholarship.

Graduation Year

2010

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

You were help to a high standard during academic classes. You have small class sizes and professors are personable. They usually give you their personal information where they can be reached, some professors you could reach at almost any time. Academic Advisors, especially the education department, were extremely helpful. Studying abroad is ideal at Cornell because of our block plan we offer (3 and 1/2 weeks of one course, then you switched to another class). The workload is intense because you only have one class to worry about and only one final at a time, too. The school is competitive within the academic subjects. The requirements (many have changed) you need 2 blocks of foreign language,a block of lab and non-lab science, block of Mathematics, and then requirements for each degree.

Quality of Life

Cornell is a very diverse, small campus. Everyone lives in the dorms all 4 years unless they get permission to live off campus. This creates a close-knit community at our school. The facilities are expanding and becoming much nicer, espesically the common area, dining, and sports center. The library is 4 floors, open to the public, and has a positive atmosphere. The community and the school are very close because it is such a small town. The crime is not high and you feel safe if you were to walk around the campus late at night if you were coming from the computer lab or library. I think the general happiness of the school is high and easy going.

Admissions

It's been a while, I do not remember much. It asked about extra curricular activities you were involved in, you received scholarships if you achieved a certain GPA in high school and it continued if you kept your college GPA above a certain number. Financial aid was available to make the cost of the school cheaper.

Graduation Year

2009

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Academic advising is fantastic. Each student is assigned a faculty adviser upon entering school. Additional advising comes from new academy type institutions (the Berry Center, Dimensions, etc) that specialize in certain disciplines. I was particularly involved in the Berry Center for Economics and Public Policy.

Class size is small. It is capped at 25, I believe. In upper level courses it is not uncommon to have less than 15 in a course.

Professors are very available for advising. I sat down with my economics professors numerous times for additional help and to discuss future plans and options.

Professors grade difficultly, but seem fair. A's are definitely earned at Cornell

Even though students are taking one class at a time, students are still forced to multitask. Instead of balancing multiple classes, students must balance multiple large assignments within a class and synthesize them into a coherent application of the material.

Extraordinary study opportunities are available, but can be hard to land. While at Cornell, I participated in small book groups with the college president, attended conferences in Washington DC and Chicago, had valuable and applicable internships and fellowships during summers and open blocks, and traveled to Uruguay with one other student and the president of the college for a month. Faculty and upper staff are very available and constantly adding to the value of education at Cornell.

Quality of Life

Housing was decent. Almost everybody lived on campus, but it is my understanding that more people are living off-campus now.

The library was more than satisfactory.

Athletic buildings were good and being improved all of the time. While I was there they built a new weight room, a new wrestling room, an indoor and outdoor track. No swimming pool though.

The food isn't very good.

Almost non-existent crime.

Overall, it's a good experience as long as you go into it not expecting to be in a big city. Cornell runs the town and as long as you are okay with being in a place that has a school of 1,200 students run it, then you will be okay.

Admissions

This was a long time ago. Cornell is very good with financial aid though. They even matched an offer from another school as incentive.

Graduation Year

2009

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Academics are competitive as one may expect at a good liberal arts college. The core requirements - while somewhat extensive - where also very broad and gave me great freedom. Class sizes were very small - never more than 25. In my junior and senior level courses there were typically 8-15, giving them the feel of graduate-level seminars. Professors are incredibly accessible - I could share numerous instances where professors went above and beyond to help me and my classmates. The professors are there to teach and that is their top priority. Yet, many still do incredible things in the field of scholarship. For example, Craig Allin (politics) and Todd Knoop (economics) were both working on books. The college gives students the ability to pursue research and study abroad.

Cornell College operates on a very unique academic calendar where students complete a single course in 3.5 weeks. This block calendar (the year is divided into 9 blocks right now but apparently is being reduced to 8) was incredibly focused and allowed for some unique opportunities in the classroom setting, including more interactive, hands-on work, field trips, and longer discussions.

Grading is generally tough - you have to work very hard if you want to earn a high grade. In addition, the classroom experience is intense but far more collegial and cooperative than it is competitive and cutthroat. The workload - while seemingly overwhelming - was actually quite manageable since you only had one class worth of homework to worry about.

Quality of Life

Cornell College is a small, residential community, so most students lived on campus or in Mount Vernon, a small town where a walk to campus was never more than 10-15 minutes away at most. With everyone living on campus, things were pretty active in terms of campus life and activities. Clubs are plentiful and - for the most part - run by students. At times it does feel a bit too small in terms of everyone knowing everything about you.

The facilities are interesting. Most buildings are actually quite old but the college has worked hard to maintain and improve them as they are able. Some of the residence halls are in desperate need of renovation and updating. They have built two new dorms but they opened after I graduated. They are suite buildings. The college has one apartment building but it is small. They are lacking in this type of housing (apartment housing).

Cost of living is very low given that it is rural Iowa. The town is very charming and the people are extremely friendly. In fact, I got involved in a couple of organizations in town and I was welcomed with open arms. I was overall very happy once I found my niche. The town is extremely safe - there were a couple of minor burglaries at a gas station but these type of events are few and far between. Everyone is trusting and friendly. I never once felt like I was in danger of anything in Mount Vernon.

The library is very nice for a college of Cornell College's size. It also has the unique feature of serving as Mt Vernon's public library. This created an interesting dynamic and had some new offerings. I never felt as though they impeded on our space, although they could add some more in terms of computer labs.

Dining was not very good while I was a student. Right before my senior year they made some changes and the food improved somewhat - they had a made-to-order option every day. However, I found myself eating a lot of pizza in my senior year (before this, they didn't have pizza on a regular basis). They have some vegetarian options but they seem somewhat limited. however, the food for the vegetarian station was tasty.

Admissions

The admission process is generally very personal. The office has early decision, early action, and regular decision and Cornell is a member of the Common Application. Admission and scholarship decisions are made at the same time. Scholarships seem to have become increasingly competitive - although it seems as if they hold back at times with awards. My class (the entering class of 2003) was the last to have an actual scholarship competition for the William Fletcher King (full tuition) scholarship. Now, those are simply awarded.

The admission staff is very personal. My counselor remained in fairly consistent contact with me throughout the process and answered questions for me and my family. If we left a message, it was returned in a prompt and courteous manner. They really were exceptional during my visits (2) to Cornell as well.

Overall, the Admission office did a nice job addressing my concerns and also coming up with a financial award that made it feasible to attend Cornell.

Graduation Year

2007

2011VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

The classes are small (all are capped at 25 students or less) and it is really easy to get to know and talk with professors. Generally the classes are pretty challenging, but that is, of course, not always the case. The professors at Cornell are absolutely amazing. Wonderful people who really care about the students. They are totally accessible and I have often built great relationships with my professors. It is really great to be able to actually talk with professors one on one and get help, have conversations, etc. There are research opportunities over the summer within some departments, but not all. One cool thing about Cornell academics is that students can totally run their own academic path. Students are able to design their own majors if they like, and have the flexibility of participating in independent studies or doing honors projects. It's really great how much flexibility there is with academics at Cornell (meaning that students can create opportunities that they wouldn't be able to necessarily at other schools).

Quality of Life

All students must live on campus for at least three years. I actually like that because it creates a nice community on campus. We all eat in one cafeteria, which is fun and creates a good community, even though the tables are divided into groups (some people compare this to high school). It's also cool because nobody really cares what grade you're in so people hang out with friends of all grades. There is one library, and I think it's pretty great for a small-school library. I go there everyday to do my homework. Most of the dorms are pretty nice. There are a couple that could definitely use renovations, but they're generally pretty livable. Every dorm has a kitchen, which makes it easy to do your own thing sometimes, and the dorms are small enough that you can get to know many people who live near you, although that doesn't always happen.

Admissions

Early action was available. Common application was available. The school offers incredible financial aid. Every student I know has a scholarship.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2012

2010VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Academics a very rigorous at Cornell College with 9 300 level coureses required for graduation as well as pre-requisites in Mathmatics, Humanities and Science. There are also major specific requirements that vary by department. All students are allowed to chooses there academic advisor who helps them navigate through thir four year. Class sizes are generally no more than 25 people but the average closer to 10. All departments have very qualified faculty that are still working to advance thier fields and generally the faculty all have at least one area of specializations. It is also very easy to travel abroud since Cornell operates on the block plan or one course at a time. In my time at Cornell I traveled to Guatemala and had an amazing experience learning Spanish.

Quality of Life

The cost of living at Cornell is very low since the College is located in a small town in Iowa. The school does not charge much to live in the dorms which is a school requirement until your senior year. The dorms maintained very well and are constantly being renovated, the newest renovations done were to the dorm Pfiefer. The library is open at all hours you could possibly need it and if you really need a place to study there is a 24 hour computer lab located in law hall. The dining at cornell is a constant student concern so the menu is always improving. Cornell enjoys a great relationship with the town of Mt. Vernon, the towns high school is even co-financing a new turf football field with the school that both the college and high school. Since Cornell resides in a small town there is very little crime that goes on so the school is very safe. The student body is overall very happy and most people are only bothered by the harsh Iowa winters.

Admissions

I had to fill out a paper application which I submitted with several refrences and two essays. After this was turned in I had an interview with my admissions representative. Before the interview I had a tour of the campus including a tour of a dorm room. After my interview I was told about my financial aid package and after I deposited I resieved more money in the form of a grant.

Graduation Year

2010

2010VERIFIED STUDENT
Academics

Very small classes - capped at 25. All taught directly by PhD credentialed faculty. Very unique academic calendar - One Course At A Time or "Block Plan." Each course is offered and taken one at a time - for a 3 1/2 week period. A semester of learning is concentrated into that period, with no two classes being taken at once.

Admissions

All of the above from a traditionally competitive private liberal arts school. Essay, emphasis on academic achievement record, ACT/SAT test scores, well-rounded participation in activities, etc.

Graduation Year

2004 or earlier

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