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Mergers & Acquisitions

Overview

M&A attorneys represent companies that are the acquirers or the targets in acquisitions, mergers, joint ventures, minority investments, spinoffs and other similar transactions. Some attorneys in this practice area focus on either acquirers or targets, or on deals involving either public or private companies, while others work broadly across many types of transactions. Many M&A attorneys, especially at larger firms, specialize in private equity transactions, representing private equity firms in the acquisition or disposition of “portfolio companies.” The day-to-day work of M&A attorneys involves negotiating transaction terms, drafting and revising documents, performing due diligence, and overseeing compliance with applicable laws. Often M&A transactions involve specialized attorneys (finance, tax, executive compensation, etc.), and the M&A attorneys generally serve as the quarterback, supervising or organizing these specialists. Attorneys on both sides of M&A transactions are generally working toward the same goal of getting the deal completed, so often, the practice is not adversarial. M&A is deal-based, so the work can come in waves and often take place over holidays or at the end of the year. M&A attorneys generally have more opportunities to go in-house than litigators or specialist corporate attorneys, in part because they tend to be seen as more generalists, having had a hand in every part of a transaction.

Featured Q&A's
Get an insider's view on working in Mergers & Acquisitions from real lawyers in the practice area.
Ting S. Chen, Partner
Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

My practice focuses on representing companies across a diverse set of industries as buyers, sellers, investors, and partners in every kind of M&A transaction, including public and private buy-sides and sell-sides, spinoffs, carve-out divestitures, and joint ventures. I also advise companies on corporate governance and activist and takeover defense matters.

What types of clients do you represent?

I represent companies spanning a variety of industries, includ-ing consumer goods, biotech, insurance, retail, media, and more. Recently, a substantial amount of my deal flow has been in the tech space.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Some of my recent deals include representing British American Tobacco in its $97 billion merger with Reynolds American; Kraft in the spinoff of its $30 billion North American grocery business and the $3.7 billion sale of its frozen pizza business to Nestlé; InterMune in its $8.9 billion sale to Roche; DreamWorks Animation in its $4.1 billion sale to Comcast; Starbucks in its commercial arrangement with Oprah Winfrey to launch Oprah Chai; The Washington Post Company in the sale of its newspaper publishing businesses to Jeff Bezos; and OneBeacon Insurance and White Mountains Insurance in the $1.7 billion sale of OneBeacon Insurance to Intact Financial.

How did you choose this practice area?

I was brought up through Cravath’s rotation system—here, corporate associates work with a small group of partners in a specific practice area for a period of time before “rotating” to a new group and practice area. Thus, I worked extensively on leveraged finance and capital markets transactions—in addition to M&A deals—as an associate. While there is no question that my financing and capital markets experience has been invaluable to my M&A practice, in the end, I was most drawn to M&A. I was fortunate that Cravath has a steady stream of complex, high-profile transactions, and so I was always incredibly busy on multiple interesting matters. I found the M&A practice dynamic, challenging, and very rewarding.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

My day-to-day schedule varies significantly. I think what M&A lawyers do can be distilled down to developing an understanding of their clients’ businesses and objectives and strategizing, negotiating, navigating issues, and structuring solutions to allow their clients to best achieve those goals—in practice, this translates into a lot of reviewing, drafting, and participating in conference calls and meetings.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Because M&A involves navigating a wide-ranging set of issues, I would recommend getting broad experience across different types of corporate transactions. In terms of law school course work, corporations law and securities regulation are good building blocks for any corporate transactional practice. It is also important to stay on top of the court decisions in our space—our practice is constantly evolving and informed by new case law—as well as broader market trends and industry developments.

What do you like best about your practice area?

Our clients consistently come to us with their biggest and most complicated deals, and it is incredibly gratifying to help them carry out successful, transformative transactions. I also like that, because every M&A deal involves different players, positions, and objectives, there is considerable room to be creative in our practice.

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

Sometimes law students have this impression—perhaps from movies about corporate raiders in the ’80s—that our practice area is dominated by table pounders. In fact, there are many highly effective M&A practitioners who do not fit this mold.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

One of the reasons I enjoy practicing at Cravath so much is that, from your first day as an associate, our firm is oriented around building collaboration. If I want to draw on the particular expertise of one of my colleagues or get a new perspective for a client, I can—and often do—tap into a remarkable bench of talent and experience. Having access to the insights of people like Christine Varney, one of the nation’s foremost antitrust experts; Judge Katherine Forrest, who just returned to Cravath from the bench; and Dave Kappos, who is widely recognized as a world leader on intellectual property law, is indispensable. This culture creates not only a fantastic place to practice law, but also gets the best results for our clients.

What kinds of experience can summer associates gain in this practice area at your firm?

At Cravath, our associates are given a great deal of responsibility early on in their careers, and our summer program is designed to provide summer associates with an experience that mirrors that of a first-year associate. We treat summer associates as a core part of a deal team, responsible for tasks expected of our first-year associates. The focus for junior associates is getting comfortable with managing the deal process and reviewing and revising agreements. I believe this early responsibility, coupled with Cravath’s culture of collaboration and investment in training associates, makes for a tremendous experience for someone who is starting his or her legal career.

Ting S. Chen, Partner—Corporate Department

Ting S. Chen is a partner in Cravath’s Corporate department. Her practice focuses on mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, and activism and takeover defense. Ting received an A.B. summa cum laude from Harvard University in 2003, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and a J.D. from Stanford Law School in 2006. Ting joined Cravath in 2006 and became a partner in 2014.

Ting has been recognized for her work in mergers and acquisitions by the 2017 and 2018 editions of The Legal 500 and the 2016 through 2019 editions of IFLR1000. In 2019, she was included in Crain’s New York Business’ list of “Notable Women in Law.” In 2017 and 2018, Ting was named a “Next Generation Lawyer” in the media and entertainment arena by The Legal 500, and in 2016, she was recommended for her transactional work in the technology industry by The Legal 500. In 2015, Ting was named a “Rising Star” by Law360, recognizing her as one of eight outstanding merger and acquisition lawyers in the nation under the age of 40.

Ting, who was born in Taipei, Taiwan, resides in New York City with her husband, Ken, and two children.

Stephen F. Arcano, Partner
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP and Affiliates

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

My practice covers a wide variety of corporate matters. My main focus is counseling on transactions involving the purchase and sale of companies through various means (mergers, tender offers, or stock or asset transfers), spinoffs, and contests for corporate control. But my work really runs the full gamut of corporate matters, including providing corporate and securities law advice to senior management teams and boards of directors, assisting companies in responding to shareholder activism, and advising on matters of critical judgment at a company’s most senior level.

What types of clients do you represent?

There really is no “typical” client. I have represented companies in some of their most high-stakes or noteworthy deals, including Mobil Corporation in its merger with Exxon Corporation, the independent directors of Time Warner Cable in its acquisition by Charter Communications, and Gilead Sciences in its acquisitions of Kite Pharma, Inc. and Pharmasset. I’ll often represent clients in cross-border deals, such as Alcatel in its merger with Lucent Technologies or WhiteWave in its sale to Danone. Many clients are smaller companies, as well, pursuing transactions that are critical to them. I’ve also represented major investment banking firms as financial advisors in a number of transactions.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Many deals I have worked on involved representing major corporations in some of their most strategic and important matters. Some situations involve responding to unsolicited offers, proxy challenges, or shareholder activism. I work on deals across practically every industry, including pharma and biotech, energy, gaming, heavy industry, health care, and consumer products, just to name a few.

How did you choose this practice area?

In the fall of 1986, when I was applying for a job for the summer of 1987, I knew I was interested in corporate law, but I didn’t know precisely what areas would be of most interest. I thought about corporate finance or M&A as likely areas of interest. M&A deals were big news at that time, and there were only a few firms with significant M&A practices. Skadden was definitely at the top of the list. I ended up at Skadden, which turned out to be a great fit personally and professionally. Over the course of that summer, in addition to M&A deals, I worked on a corporate finance assignment and then a tax assignment. Both were good experiences, but I was hooked on M&A. I loved the energy and the excitement, and I knew I had found my practice.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

There really is no typical day for me. The job involves a lot of telephone time with clients, financial advisors, or counterparties. I review transaction documents and discuss transaction issues with the deal team. I also spend a good deal of time coordinating with my colleagues in other practices here at the firm. Often when working on a deal, we loop in other Skadden attorneys from a wide variety of practices, such as tax or antitrust, and as the M&A partner on the deal, I often have to quarterback those efforts.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Because M&A deals often involve so many disciplines, it’s also good to have a general corporate background. Taking courses or attending seminars on a range of corporate topics—such as corporations and corporate law, securities laws, corporate finance, or corporate tax—is always beneficial. If you know you’re interested in M&A, I would also recommend taking a course in M&A negotiations.

What is the most challenging aspect of your practice area?

One of the challenging aspects of M&A work is coordinating the multiple work streams required to move a deal along from conception to execution and then finally to completion. In advising the board of directors and management, there is often a challenge in trying to identify and understand multiple viewpoints and then help bring all the parties to a consensus in order to craft a solution and move the deal forward. In negotiations, it often can be challenging to understand what the other side’s goals may be, and crafting a solution that accommodates both sides, while doing what’s best for your client, is necessary in order to get the deal done.

What do you like best about your practice area?

One challenge I enjoy is finding ways to “see around the corner” when working on a deal. We strive to anticipate potential issues or contingencies before they pop up—and before they’re on anyone else’s radar—and then try to get ahead of those issues or craft solutions. It’s part of the constantly changing nature of working on a deal, and every transaction is different.

The intellectual stimulation of M&A practice is a real attraction. Working on deals across industries, you’re continually addressing different intellectual challenges and learning new things. I really thrive on digging into difficult legal issues and then finding a novel path to address a problem.

Also, even after working on many headline-making deals over the years, it’s still exciting to open The Wall Street Journal in the morning and see a deal you’re working on featured.

What are some typical career paths for lawyers in this practice area?

Attorneys in M&A have many options when it comes to choosing a career path. For me personally, I was on a path focused on excelling at Skadden, where I started, and aimed at making partner. For others, who decide to go into the business side, there is potential to go into corporate development at a client’s organization or become a member of an in-house legal department. Some M&A attorneys have gone on to work at financial institutions, either on the advisory side at investment banks or as consultants, or on the investment side at private equity firms or hedge funds. Others have leveraged their experience in the M&A world to develop and grow their own startups.

How do you deal with the fast-paced nature of your work in M&A, especially given the high stakes for your client?

Over time, doing what we do, you definitely learn the substance of the law from the multitude of transactions we tackle. But beyond that, you also learn to manage the complexity and the pace of high-stakes mergers and acquisitions. You learn not to get too stressed by the pace, and then you’ll discover that pace is part of what makes you enjoy showing up at the office every day.

Stephen F. Arcano, Partner & Global Head of Transactions Practices (New York Office)

Stephen F. Arcano serves as global co-head of the firm’s transactions practices, advising companies, boards of directors, and financial institutions on a wide range of corporate matters, including mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, and other corporate and securities laws matters. He has worked on a variety of high-profile mergers, acquisitions, and contested situations representing acquirers, sellers, and targets.

Steve is an adjunct professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center and has lectured at various other law schools and seminars. He was named as one of The American Lawyer’s Dealmakers of the Year in 2017 and repeatedly has been selected for inclusion in Chambers Global: The World’s Leading Lawyers for Business and Chambers USA: America’s Leading Lawyers for Business. He also has been listed in The Best Lawyers in America, Lawdragon 500 Leading Lawyers in America, and IFLR1000.

Keith Pagnani, Partner
Sullivan & Cromwell LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

Our Mergers & Acquisitions practice is extremely dynamic, and we work closely with our colleagues across all of the firm’s different practice areas and geographies. Lawyers from multiple disciplines and offices within S&C work with each other and with our clients (as well as with investment bankers, accountants, proxy solicitors, and other advisers) to execute some of the world’s largest and most complex and noteworthy transactions. As the co-head of S&C’s Healthcare and Life Sciences group, I also have the opportunity to work with some of the most innovative companies in the world. It has been especially exciting to have had a front row seat to the evolution of these companies as the industry continues to evolve.

What types of clients do you represent?

One of the benefits of working at S&C is advising major global corporations in some of the world’s largest, most complex, and noteworthy transactions across a range of industries. We also represent smaller companies whose transactions involve enormous strategic significance. Regardless of the representation or the company, the work we do is always professionally stimulating and rewarding.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

As M&A lawyers, we’re given the opportunity to think strategically and interface with a variety of stakeholders. At S&C, we approach M&A transactions as we do across all of our practice areas—as “business lawyers.” Over the course of any transaction, we’re working with a company’s board and C-Suite, while at the same time, navigating multi-jurisdictional regulators and myriad judicial aspects (e.g., the Delaware Chancery Court)—not to mention the other side! Having the opportunity to work across from and alongside all of these diverse constituents makes for an incredibly challenging and rewarding career.

Over the course of my career, I’ve advised an array of companies across the industry spectrum, including most recently Harris Corporation in its $35 billion pending merger of equals with L3 Technologies, the largest ever transaction in the defense industry. I also led the team that advised Praxair in its $80 billion merger of equals with Linde, a challenging, multijurisdictional transaction that had been ongoing since 2016. Additional clients include UnitedHealth Group, Delta Air Lines, Booking Holdings (formerly The Priceline Group), and Alcon. The diverse nature of our clients and transactions helps keep me on my toes and creates a sense of excitement with each new deal.

How did you choose this practice area?

I’ve been at the firm now for about 30 years. I came out of law school in the late 1980s, just as M&A was really taking off. The headlines were attention grabbing and spoke of corporate raiders, hostile activity, and a wave of change in the business world; I knew M&A was where I wanted to be. Looking back, however, I think I may have picked M&A for all the wrong reasons but stayed for all the right reasons. M&A certainly was—and still is—newsworthy and exciting, but that’s not necessarily why you want to choose an area of expertise. What got me to stay and live in the practice was the skill set that M&A requires and the impact it has on the corporate world at large.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

A typical day is the fact that there is no typical day. That being said, there are varying degrees of similar activities in my day to day. You might find me in a conference room negotiating a merger agreement, in a boardroom advising a client’s directors on a potential transaction, in S&C’s offices working with fellow partners and associates to structure and execute transactions, or at a conference speaking. I also travel to meet prospective and current clients to both build and maintain relationships. This variety provides for a truly exciting and fulfilling career.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

I would recommend trying to get as much hands-on experience as you can early on in your career. What drew me to S&C was the promise that I would get substantive work at a relatively junior level, and that has indeed been my experience. We staff our deals relatively leanly, so our junior associates have an abundance of terrific, real-world training as soon as they join us. We also recognize the importance of teaching junior associates and helping them to contextualize a transaction; it is the responsibility of partners and senior associates to cultivate the younger ranks in order for them to reach their full potential. With that said, our learning structure is non-hierarchical, as I’m constantly learning from the juniors on my deal teams, who have been tasked with researching and investigating a particular issue or aspect of the law. We really believe that—in order to optimize what we have—it’s important to have a lot of multi-directional knowledge sharing.

What do you like best about your practice area?

What I love about M&A is that it forces you to be a dynamic thinker and requires a diverse set of skills. As dealmakers, we’re often interacting with the upper ranks of our clients, including board members, C-Suite executives, and, of course, general counsels. Over the course of a company’s history, M&A borders on the “extraordinary”; as a lawyer, being able to work at such a high level in these transformational matters is equally extraordinary. I also really enjoy the pace of M&A. At times, it can be frenetic, but you’re able to move from one deal to the next relatively quickly; there is always something new and exciting in the pipeline. The transactions are different enough that the work does not get monotonous, but similar enough to call on your previous experiences, creating a nice balance.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

The M&A practice at S&C calls upon so many resources at the firm across practice areas, which is reflective of how we’ve built our transactional practice more broadly. For example, in many cases, our lawyers in our regional offices have spent significant time either in New York or interacting with lawyers in New York, and so all of us have a consistent approach to problem solving and client service. I love when a client tells me that he or she has an integrated experience while dealing with my colleagues across our offices in Europe or Asia—it’s a win from the client’s perspective and a win from the firm’s perspective, too. We recently advised on a record-breaking cross-border deal that brought together lawyers across our regional offices (New York, London, and Frankfurt) and also across practice groups (antitrust, capital markets, environmental, executive compensation, finance, intellectual property, M&A, regulatory, and tax). Our ability to work seamlessly across practice groups and offices is what sets us apart and makes us unique. It allows us to serve our clients in a highly efficient way.

What kinds of experience can summer associates gain in this practice area at your firm?

We make a real effort to give our summer associates substantive experience. I work with my summer associates just as though they were regular associates—we focus less on labeling people based on tenure and more on individuals and their willingness and ability to challenge themselves. That being said, we also want our summer associates to strike the right balance between doing meaningful work and taking advantage of the terrific social opportunities that we offer. At the end of the day, we’re looking for matches—if you’re a summer associate at S&C, we already think you’re a match for us, but you need to confirm that we’re a match for you, too.

What are some typical career paths for lawyers in this practice area?

M&A lawyers tend to be highly desirable in the marketplace, and I think the career paths for associates in this area are unlimited. As a truly business-minded lawyer, you need to be dynamic and quick on your feet in order to be successful; employers are naturally drawn to these attributes when they are looking at potential candidates. Junior M&A lawyers get to see the entire scope of their deals and get an A-to-Z look at the inner workings of strategy, negotiations, drafting, and people skills—there’s no doubt that future employers appreciate that type of well-rounded perspective. As a result, there are lots of different opportunities available to M&A lawyers. I’ve seen people go in-house to important firm clients, into investment banking, into private equity—the list goes on.

Keith Pagnani, Partner—General Practice

Recognized by The American Lawyer as “Dealmaker of the Week” for his role advising UnitedHealth in its subsidiary OptumRx’s $12.8 billion combination with Catamaran Corporation and “Dealmaker of the Year” for his role advising Alcon, Inc.’s independent directors committee in Alcon’s $52.9 billion acquisition by Novartis AG, Keith Pagnani is actively involved in Sullivan & Cromwell’s M&A practice and has broad experience representing buyers, sellers, special committees of independent directors, and financial advisers on a wide range of domestic and international merger and acquisition transactions.

Mr. Pagnani also is actively involved in the firm’s management and administration, including as co-head of the firm’s Healthcare and Life Sciences group and as a member of the firm’s Managing Partners Committee, Billing Policy Committee, and Diversity Committee.

Jenna E. Levine, Partner
Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

My practice involves mergers and acquisitions (including public company transactions, private company acquisitions, and asset sales/carveouts), spinoffs, corporate governance matters and securities work. At any given time, I am usually involved in a mix of different types of matters in a variety of industries. Much of my work is transaction based, but an equally important part of my practice is working closely with clients on an ongoing basis to advise on shareholder relations, strategic considerations, and other important questions that arise as they operate their businesses.

What types of clients do you represent?

I represent public companies in a range of industries (including energy, technology, financial services, health care, retail and consumer products, and industrial services, among others). My clients have included Cigna Corporation, Thomson Reuters Corporation, Analog Devices, CONSOL Energy,  Sysco Corporation, Freeport-McMoRan, AbbVie, Saks, Interoil, Activision Blizzard, AMB Property Corporation, Sotheby’s, Energizer, MCG Capital Corporation, KKR Financial Holdings, Brink’s, Ally Financial, and the Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Mergers and acquisitions, spinoffs, proxy contests and other corporate governance matters, and securities transactions. Recent matters that I have been involved with include representing Cigna Corporation in its combination with Express Scripts Holding Company; Thomson Reuters Corporation in its strategic partnership with Blackstone for the Thomson Reuters Financial and Risk business; Analog Devices in its acquisition of Linear Technology; Interoil in its proposed acquisition by Oil Search and its acquisition by ExxonMobil following a topping bid; Saks in its acquisition by Hudson’s Bay; a special committee of the board of Activision Blizzard in Activision’s repurchase of shares from Vivendi; CONSOL Energy in the spinoff of its coal business, an acquisition of natural gas assets, and its acquisition of the publicly held shares of CNX Gas Corporation; Energizer Holdings in the spinoff of its household products and personal care divisions; AbbVie in its acquisition of Pharmacyclics; Freeport-McMoRan in its acquisitions of McMoRan Exploration and Plains Exploration & Production and in multiple sales of oil and gas assets;  the Mohegan Tribal Gaming Authority in a debt exchange offer; KKR Financial Holdings in its acquisition by KKR; Cardinal Health in its formation of a joint venture with CVS Caremark; and Vulcan Materials in its response to the unsolicited acquisition offer by Martin Marietta.

How did you choose this practice area?

I was relatively sure that I wanted to pursue corporate law when I started law school because I enjoy negotiating, working with a team, and problem solving. I spent my 2L summer at Wachtell Lipton, working on corporate matters but also doing a rotation in the Litigation department to make sure I was exploring my options. I enjoyed that experience, but overall, my summer confirmed my expectations that corporate law was the best fit for me. I particularly liked that the corporate practice at Wachtell was so broad, and I wouldn’t have to choose a narrow area to focus on before I’d had the chance to try things out. The variety in my practice is one of the things that keeps it interesting, and I always feel like I get to challenge myself with new skills and questions.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

I don’t really have a typical day or week, which is one of the reasons I enjoy my work as much as I do. The way I spend my time varies depending on what stage my matters are in, but one constant is that I spend much of my day on the phone, either working with clients to learn about their objectives and challenges and strategizing ways to address them or negotiating with counsel for a transaction counterparty. I also do a lot of drafting transaction documents and working with other attorneys on our team to evaluate strategic options, corporate law or securities law questions, or structuring considerations with respect to corporate matters in various stages of development.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Attorneys who succeed in the corporate practice have a wide variety of backgrounds and skills before they join the firm. Personally, I think it is always helpful to have some work experience before law school if possible—it helps to ease the transition to working at a firm and lets you focus more on the substance of your work. It is also helpful to have taken one or more corporate law classes, even though you’ll do most of your learning on the job. Strong writing skills, people skills, and public speaking skills are also important.

What is the most challenging aspect of practicing in this area?

The most interesting matters I work on are also often the most challenging—clients come to us with matters where there often isn’t a clear path forward or where, for whatever reason, the standard way of doing things won’t work. This requires a lot of creativity and a firm understanding of the rules we’re operating within, so we can devise a solution that works and that meets the client’s needs.

What do you like best about your practice area?

Getting to build relationships with my clients and work collaboratively with them to achieve their most important goals and address their biggest challenges is very fulfilling. Our clients trust us with complex challenges every day, and I take that responsibility very seriously. It is rewarding to get to see the results of my work, and the nature of the situations I encounter in my practice means that I never get bored.

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

I think some people believe that negotiations and M&A involve a lot of screaming and confrontation, and that is really rarely the case (although it happens sometimes). I think people would be surprised at how respectful and collegial most people can be while still forcefully advocating for their client’s interests.

What is unique about this practice area at your firm?

The corporate practice at Wachtell Lipton is structured differently in a number of ways—we have a low partner-to-associate ratio and take a lot of pride in making sure that even our most junior lawyers develop a broad-based skill set and get real client exposure. My practice has looked very different at different times since I joined the firm—I started here during the financial crisis and initially spent a lot of my time working on transactions to help clients manage their liabilities and weather the difficult economy. During other periods, I’ve found myself focusing on proxy contests, spinoffs, or public M&A because those are the types of transactions my clients have been pursuing in those periods.

Jenna E. Levine, Partner—Mergers & Acquisitions

Jenna E. Levine is a partner in Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz’s Corporate department. She focuses on mergers and acquisitions, corporate governance, and capital markets transactions. Jenna received a B.A. from Dartmouth College in 2001. She completed a J.D. in 2008 at Columbia Law School, where she was a Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar, received the Paul R. Hays Prize in Civil Procedure, and served as online editor of the Columbia Law Review. Prior to attending law school, Jenna worked as an associate at an investment banking firm.

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