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Overview

Antitrust attorneys help companies navigate competition issues created by organic growth or acquisition under national and international laws and regulations. Antitrust attorneys straddle the line between litigation and corporate attorneys. They may advise about possible antitrust regulatory issues in an acquisition or other transaction and also represent companies in litigation, especially against the Department of Justice, Federal Trade Commission, or similar foreign government agencies. The stakes in antitrust cases can be very high “bet the company” litigation and involve complicated, sophisticated issues that can turn on minute details. Antitrust lawyers tend to be smart, methodical, and cerebral. Antitrust practitioners work across industries, and each engagement requires the attorneys to understand the products or services at issue, how they are made, how they are sold, how firms compete, and how they collaborate. It is common for antitrust attorneys in the U.S. to spend at least part of their careers working for the Department of Justice or FTC.

Featured Q&A's
Get an insider's view on working in Antitrust from real lawyers in the practice area.
Jeremy Calsyn, Partner
Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

Cleary Gottlieb’s antitrust practice is actively involved in high-profile transactions with the most interesting antitrust issues, closely watched cartel and monopolization investigations, and high-stakes antitrust litigations. We serve clients in all areas of antitrust law, including pre-merger notification and related advocacy efforts before the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the Department of Justice (DOJ), the European Commission, and other global agencies; every type and stage of government investigation; a wide range of civil and criminal antitrust litigation; and general antitrust counseling. We are the only law firm top-tier ranked for antitrust in both the United States and Europe by Chambers Global (2011-20), are the only “Band 1” Antitrust firm in Washington according to Chambers USA (2019), and are ranked No. 1 in the “Global Elite” for Antitrust by Global Competition Review (2020). Recently, we were named Law360’s 2019 Competition/Antitrust Practice Group of the Year and Benchmark Litigation’s Antitrust Firm of the Year.

What types of clients do you represent?

Our practice advises clients from the United States and all over the world across all major industries. Current clients include American Express, Applied Materials, Broadcom, The Dow Chemical Corporation, Deutsche Telekom/T-Mobile, Fox Corporation, GlaxoSmithKline, Google, Keurig, Sabre, Samsung, Lenovo, United Technologies Corporation, Sanofi, Western Digital, and Whirlpool.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Unlike some other firms, Cleary Gottlieb’s Antitrust group does not specifically assign attorneys to particular specialty areas or industries. Our antitrust lawyers are able to handle transactions, litigation, and investigations across a number of industries. Like most of my colleagues, I work on a range of matters in many different industries. My transactional matters have included: Western Digital/SanDisk, Medtronic/Covidien, Asahi Kasei/Polypore International, ArcelorMittal/ThyssenKrupp Steel USA, JUUL Labs/Altria, Dollar Thrifty/Hertz, Dow/Rohm & Haas, and Google/Admeld.

I am also advising several companies in ongoing investigations by the DOJ, the European Commission, and other antitrust authorities into possible price fixing and in related class action litigation. Recent matters include representing several automotive parts suppliers in worldwide cartel investigations, and related civil litigation; and representing “K” Line in winning the dismissal of price-fixing class actions brought in federal court and later at the Federal Maritime Commission by direct and indirect purchasers of ocean vehicle carrier services.

How did you choose this practice area?

When I graduated law school, I intended to become a corporate transactional lawyer and I started in that area at Cleary. Soon after I started, I struck up a conversation at dinner with some lawyers who were doing antitrust work and asked them to keep me in mind for their next project. They later offered me the opportunity to join the antitrust team involved in the review of the Dow-Union Carbide merger. I jumped at the chance and found that I enjoyed the opportunity to learn the details of a client’s business, products, competition, and pricing strategies, as well as the economic and advocacy experience that a merger review involves. After that transaction, there was no looking back. I was later able to expand my antitrust work more broadly into criminal defense and civil litigation involving antitrust claims and issues—as well as merger analysis and advocacy.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

Our practice varies so much; there isn’t really a typical day. In the antitrust merger area, a day could involve participating in calls/meetings with business people to learn about their products and their business in order to analyze a possible transaction, preparing advocacy papers, or participating in meetings with the antitrust regulators regarding the transaction—typically arguing why the transaction does not raise competition concerns. Sometimes these cases involve trials and preliminary injunction proceedings in various courts and agencies. At Cleary, these projects often require consideration of jurisdictions in Asia, Europe, and South America, as well as the United States, and involve collaborating with our colleagues abroad.

In the criminal antitrust area, a week may involve interviews of company employees regarding conduct under investigation, calls with overseas counsel to coordinate the internal investigation and analysis, and meetings or interviews with prosecutors. In the civil area, a week may involve preparing court filings, appearing at hearings, taking or defending depositions, or participating in discovery efforts regarding the lawsuit at issue.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Obviously, taking antitrust in law school is a good idea. If you can take economics/law and other economics courses, those will help as well. If you are interested in criminal work, it’s a good idea to have a strong base in criminal procedure and criminal law. As to skills development, the practice of antitrust law involves a great deal of litigation advocacy. As an advocate, a good antitrust lawyer needs to be able to analyze a wide range of facts to build a case. This requires strong writing and oral advocacy skills and an ability to work with clients directly. While in law school, clinics and trial practice courses can help provide the direct experience needed to hone these skills.

What is the most challenging aspect of practicing in this area?

The breadth of the practice is a very positive aspect of antitrust, but it can also be a challenge to keep up with the latest developments across all areas of the practice. We are fortunate to have a great staff and an excellent practice group that coordinates to ensure we have timely training and updates on new developments.

What do you like best about your practice area?

The best aspects of my practice include the opportunity to learn about a wide variety of companies and products from around the world and how their industries operate; the opportunities for client interaction that the work provides; and the ability to use legal skills in a wide variety of areas—civil litigation, regulatory advocacy, corporate transactional work, and criminal investigations.

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

When I started at the firm, I thought antitrust was a narrow niche practice area. I now know that it is a very broad, substantive area that allows opportunities in litigation, corporate transactional work, regulatory work—domestically and internationally—and criminal work.

Antitrust is also increasingly international—I regularly work with colleagues at Cleary not only in Europe, but also in Latin America and Asia and other law firms across the globe.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

Three features make Cleary’s Antitrust practice unique. First, within the antitrust practice area, most lawyers work across several areas of the antitrust spectrum, whether it is criminal antitrust work, merger work, or civil antitrust litigation. Our lawyers are experts in all of these areas and are able to see a deal through, all the way to defending it in court if necessary. Second, most of our matters involve international issues and the coordination of work across jurisdictions as a result of the history of the firm and our global reputation. This is an area where Cleary excels, thanks to our strong global integration. Finally, our Antitrust group stands out due to the strength we have at all levels of our practice—from senior partners to junior partners to associates. This is no accident; we consistently give our associates autonomy and responsibility as soon as they can handle it and invest the time to help them develop their skills. We consistently receive positive feedback from clients on the quality of advice our associates give, and it’s not uncommon for a Cleary mid-level associate to work comfortably across the table from a partner at a peer firm.

Jeremy Calsyn, Partner—Antitrust

Jeremy Calsyn is based in Cleary’s Washington, DC, office. His practice focuses on the full range of antitrust matters, including merger review, criminal and civil government investigations, and litigation. Recently, he has navigated several automotive parts suppliers through U.S. DOJ and worldwide investigations into alleged industry-wide price fixing—described by the DOJ as the largest criminal investigation it has ever undertaken. He joined the firm in 1999 and became a partner in 2008. From 2000-2001, Jeremy served as law clerk to the Honorable Louis F. Oberdorfer of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

Jeremy has been recognized for his antitrust work by Chambers USA, Chambers Global, The Legal 500 U.S., Benchmark Litigation, and Global Competition Review. He was named an “M&A and Antitrust Trailblazer” by The National Law Journal and to GCR’s “40 Under 40 Most Talented Young Competition Lawyers.” Jeremy is vice chair of the ABA Antitrust Law Section, Cartel and Criminal Practice and previously served as a member of the ABA Antitrust Law Section’s International Cartel Task Force.

Jeremy earned his J.D., magna cum laude, from Georgetown University Law Center in 1999 and a B.S., summa cum laude, from Southwest Missouri State University in 1995.

Anna Pletcher, Partner
O'Melveny & Myers LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

I represent clients in criminal and civil antitrust litigation, advise on competition-related issues, and guide clients facing white collar prosecutions and investigations. In each aspect of my practice, I am able to draw on my decade of prosecutorial experience to help my clients plan and execute their best strategies.

What types of clients do you represent?

I represent corporations and individuals in a variety of different industries, from technology to consumer goods to entertainment.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

I work on antitrust cartel cases, defending corporations and individuals that are being investigated for price fixing, bid rigging, or market manipulation. On the civil litigation side, I represent companies that are defending against antitrust lawsuits. I also advise companies on how to create policies that will minimize their risk of antitrust violations.

And I do a significant amount of pro bono work. I am involved in a habeas corpus matter dealing with a juvenile offender and a case helping a teen immigrant get asylum. I am also assisting a family that was separated at the border, and I am volunteering with a restorative justice program for youth.

How did you choose this practice area?

I fell into antitrust by accident. When I was clerking, I saw an advertisement for the DOJ Honors Program. There are very few entry-level opportunities at the federal government and even fewer in San Francisco. But the Antitrust Division’s San Francisco office was hiring honors attorneys at the time. I had never taken an antitrust class, so I scrambled to read the Sherman Act and some case law. With that and my background in investment banking, I was extremely fortunate to get the job. And I loved it from the very first day. It was meant to be!

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

On a typical day, I may have a call with a client to discuss the status of their case. I often review and edit drafts of briefs and correspondence that associates have been working on. I often have conferences with associates to guide them through their projects. I read articles and news reports so that I can stay up to date on the latest developments in antitrust law. Since I came to private practice directly from the government, I am also working on building my business. I go to conferences, speak on panels, write articles, and network with potential clients and other attorneys in the field.

I also volunteer in my community. I am president of the Association of Latino Marin Attorneys and a volunteer judge for Marin County Youth Court, a restorative-justice-based diversion program for youth. I often have responsibilities for these organizations that I fit into my typical day.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

Trial skills are important. Antitrust trials are few and far between, but getting that trial experience is key. Taking a trial advocacy course and participating in moot court are great ways to start developing those skills in law school. Writing is also critical. Most people are not born great writers. It takes time and practice to build that skill. Writing for a journal, clerking for a judge, or participating in a law clinic are good ways to start. Reading is just as important as writing. I recommend editing peers’ work, reading whole cases as opposed to annotated versions in textbooks, and just reading widely. In the antitrust space, there are some interesting popular books out now, including Tim Wu’s The Curse of Bigness and Matt Stoller’s Goliath. And then there’s the cult favorite, The Informant, which describes the famous prosecution of the lysine price-fixing cartel and was made into a movie featuring Matt Damon.

What do you like best about your practice area?

I love that antitrust law is continually changing. The Sherman Act is a statute of few words, but an enormous body of jurisprudence has developed around it through the common law. As societal values change and new technologies develop, antitrust law adapts with it.

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

For several years, I taught a course at Berkeley Law on white collar crime. Students were always very curious when we got to the section on criminal antitrust because the field was something of a mystery to them. Antitrust has a reputation for being complex and esoteric and has not, until recently, been the subject of much discussion in popular culture. However, with the rise of tech giants and increased media attention—even presidential candidates debating antitrust policy on national TV—knowledge of and interest in the field is growing. I think there is an increasing understanding that antitrust law plays an important role in the health of our economy and our democracy. Antitrust is intellectually interesting, but it is also very meaningful. I hope more new attorneys consider it as a career!

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area?

Antitrust work is litigation. As in any litigation practice, junior lawyers would be conducting legal research, drafting memos, reviewing documents, managing discovery, and drafting motions and briefs.

What are some typical career paths for lawyers in this practice area?

Many attorneys in private antitrust practice have worked for the government at some point in their careers. A typical path is to work two to five years in a firm, move to the government, and then go back to private practice. The DOJ Antitrust Division and the FTC are the two federal antitrust enforcers. States also have antitrust enforcement authorities. It is helpful to have worked at one of these agencies because antitrust cases, both on the criminal and civil side, are complex and unique in many ways. Understanding how the government builds an antitrust case provides useful insight when advising clients.

Anna Pletcher, Partner—Antitrust & Competition

Anna Pletcher is an experienced litigator and former federal prosecutor who represents clients on a broad range of antitrust issues, as well as sensitive white collar and corporate investigations.

Prior to joining O’Melveny, Anna served for 10 years as a trial attorney for the United States Department of Justice Antitrust Division, where she investigated and prosecuted a variety of complex cases, including price fixing, bid rigging, market manipulation, fraud, and money laundering. Anna also served as a special assistant United States attorney in the Major Crimes unit in San Francisco and as assistant chief of the United States Department of Justice, Antitrust Division San Francisco office.

During her decade-long tenure as a prosecutor, Anna worked closely with various components of the federal and state criminal justice systems, including the FBI, United States Probation, and the California Attorney General’s office. Recognized for her exemplary work, Anna received the Assistant Attorney General’s Award in 2014, 2011, and 2007.

Jamillia Ferris, Partner
Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

I help companies that are facing bet-the-company antitrust investigations by the FTC or the DOJ, with merger investigations taking up the majority of my time.

The FTC and DOJ review mergers to determine whether they will lessen competition. My job is to help the government lawyers understand the marketplace dynamics in which my clients operate and ultimately to explain why the transaction will not, in fact, harm competition. I also advise my clients on antitrust risk before they do a deal so they can protect against antitrust risk. That involves talking to the company about how its business operates, as well as working with economic experts to help understand all of the dimensions of competition in the industry and then explaining all of that to regulators.

I also represent companies that are being harmed by other industry players or that are concerned about industry consolidation. In these matters, my role is to investigate whether those actions would violate the antitrust laws, and, if so, I work with regulators to give them the information they need to bring a case against that behavior.

What types of clients do you represent?

In the past couple of years, I have worked on deals involving a wide range of companies, including software, semiconductor, online platform, financial services, defense, and retail companies. Examples include T-Mobile, WeddingWire, Cvent, SKHynix, and Brocade.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

Right now, I am working on two merger investigations—one involving the online advertising industry and another non-public investigation into a potential retail grocery company transaction. I am also advising a wide range of companies that are considering whether to enter into a transaction.

How did you choose this practice area?

A lot of my colleagues knew early on that they were interested in antitrust—either because they took the class in law school or they were exposed to antitrust issues. That was not my experience. I really enjoyed law school, but I did not know exactly in which area of law I wanted to practice. I had worked in government and on public policy issues before law school, so I thought I would like a career that involved some kind of government interface. I was initially drawn to consumer protection and privacy matters involving tech companies and was mentored by a group of women partners whose practice also included antitrust. They eventually brought me to DOJ, and since that time, I have been exclusively focused on antitrust work.

But what has kept me here is the variation in workload, cases, and clients. Mergers are fast paced and resolved in a relatively short time period. This means that every year brings a new mix of clients, industries, and issues, which keeps things interesting.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

On a daily basis, I am on the phone with government regulators, reviewing my client’s transactions; corporate lawyers at Wilson Sonsini or other law firms who are negotiating deals and want to understand the antitrust risk; and businesspeople running the day to day of my clients’ business operations.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

For those who know they are interested in antitrust, obviously antitrust and economics classes are very good foundations. But, if not, the same skills that are useful in all areas of law are useful for antitrust, and younger lawyers should find ways to get strong training in legal research, writing, and oral advocacy—all of which are aspects of an antitrust practice.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

The client base. While my practice spans a range of industries, including traditional defense and retail clients, the bread and butter of our practice is the tech sector. This means that our lawyers really get to know the tech industry, and because of the dynamism in tech, we are involved in cutting-edge legal issues for clients that are changing our entire economy. As merger lawyers, it also means that we have a robust pipeline of work, as it is a space that experiences a high volume of deal activity. Another way our practice is unique is that in addition to merger work, we have a very strong platform for antitrust litigation as well as criminal and civil conduct investigations. We also staff across offices, which means our lawyers work closely with other antitrust lawyers and colleagues in California, New York, and Europe.

What are some typical tasks that a junior lawyer would perform in this practice area?

Another way our practice is different is the responsibilities given to junior lawyers. It is not at all unusual for our junior associates to be working across the table from more-senior lawyers at other firms, including partners. We have a very flat structure and give associates as much work and as much responsibility as they seek out. This includes having direct client interaction on a daily basis, taking the lead on government presentations, and running all aspects of an investigation.

How do you see this practice area evolving in the future?

Antitrust is definitely an active area of law and will continue to be for the foreseeable future. Antitrust enforcement across the board has increased, and all of the presidential candidates and leaders across the political spectrum have stressed its importance.

What kinds of experience can summer associates gain in this practice area at your firm?

Hands-on experience. Our summer associates are key members of our team and are staffed on matters as if they were already at our firm working as associates.

Jamillia Ferris, Partner—Regulatory & Compliance

Jamillia Ferris is a partner in the Washington, DC, office of Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, where she is a member of the antitrust and competition practice. She started her career after a federal clerkship in a large, multinational law firm, working on antitrust and consumer protection investigations at the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). She chose that area of the law because it involved the intersection of government, public policy, and business. After six years of practice, she joined the Obama Administration, serving in leadership positions and overseeing merger review at both DOJ and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). In those roles, she obtained a firsthand and behind-the-scenes perspective on how government regulators analyze mergers and their effects on competition and consumers.

Dustin Guzior, Partner
Sullivan & Cromwell LLP

Describe your practice area and what it entails.

I practice in intellectual property and antitrust primarily. In intellectual property, my practice ranges from district court litigations, cases that are heading to trial for patent infringement or misappropriation of trade secrets, all the way through to transactional work, organizing patent pools and providing advice about how patent licensing programs should work. Within antitrust, I gravitate toward cases with a technology or IP dimension to them, so I tend to work on antitrust projects for technology companies and have been working on issues associated with the so-called “Big Tech” investigations that the FTC and DOJ launched this past year. I also do a fair amount of merger clearance work.

While that’s the centerpiece of my practice, at S&C we have a generalist approach, and the clients I have in the IP and antitrust spaces often send other types of cases in my direction. For example, I’ve started to focus on litigating M&A disputes, either in the context of post-closing disputes or litigation surrounding the closing of a deal. In a nutshell, there’s a wide range to the work I do—which is typical of lawyers at S&C—but I generally focus on cases with a technology component to them.

What types of clients do you represent?

I represent a number of technology clients, but within that set, there is again a very broad range, from companies that focus on chemistry and genetics technologies to companies that focus on medical devices, pharmaceuticals, electronics, or computer system inventions.

What types of cases/deals do you work on?

I’ve worked on a number of cases for Bayer, I work with professors at Columbia University who focus on computer systems technology, and I’ve been collaborating with a number of other universities, which is incredibly exciting. I’ve also done work for Blackberry, Dolby, Cisco Systems, and IBM, to name a few. So, while my work focuses on technology, the type of technology on which my clients focus is quite broad.

How did you choose this practice area?

On the antitrust side, this field sort of chose me. I didn’t join S&C thinking I would become an antitrust lawyer, but I had two really great mentors—both of whom focused on antitrust—and I found the analysis fascinating. It’s an area of the law where—with some exceptions—there aren’t bright-line rules. You have tremendous opportunity to devise novel arguments that may advance your client’s position.

It was a bit more of a natural draw on the IP side. I have a background in the hard sciences: My undergraduate degree is in physics and biological chemistry, and I spent several years as a research scientist at the University of Chicago in the areas of immunology and virology. I really enjoy using my background in my capacity as a lawyer and learning technology in the context of my clients’ cases.

What is a typical day like and/or what are some common tasks you perform?

There’s a huge range to what I do from day to day. In any given week, I could be in court, preparing for a jury trial or a hearing or participating in meetings with government regulators or with our clients’ executives to help them understand a particular transaction. Recently, for example, I was in Washington meeting with the assistant attorney general in charge of the Antitrust Division, discussing an acquisition in the oil pipes industry. The next week, I was in Richmond, VA, doing a Markman argument in district court. A lot of time also is spent providing practical advice to clients to solve their issues in a less formal setting, such as litigation or antitrust risk assessment during negotiations. As much fun as it is to score a big win in court, it’s also very satisfying to think through and solve a problem with a client in the background.

What training, classes, experience, or skills development would you recommend to someone who wishes to enter your practice area?

I would encourage students who are interested in antitrust to familiarize themselves with the larger concepts that are essential to understanding our practice, like the merger clearance process, as there is a great deal of work being done in that space. Some ways to do this are by reviewing the Federal Trade Commission and Justice Department’s guidelines and policy statements and to study the few litigated merger cases on record, like the trial transcript for AT&T/Time Warner. A lot of the “law” for antitrust is not what you will find in a typical textbook for a law school course.

What misconceptions exist about your practice area?

I frequently hear from law students that they think they need a technology background to become an IP lawyer or that they need an economics background to become an antitrust lawyer. Some of the greatest IP trial lawyers have no science or technology background; rather, they’re former assistant U.S. attorneys who are highly skilled at explaining to a jury the merits of their client’s position. I would encourage any student who is interested in IP or antitrust to pursue those fields regardless of their undergraduate background or work experience.

What is unique about your practice area at your firm?

What’s unique about S&C comes back to our generalist approach. The joy of practicing at a firm like ours is that you could be doing a different thing every week of the year. My focus may be on IP and technology, but the scope of my practice is incredibly broad: One day, I might be drafting transaction documents for a patent pool, but another day, I might be doing more traditional litigation activity for a patent infringement or trade secret case. Or a client may come to us with a new problem related to work we’ve done for them: For example, an M&A dispute may evolve into us acting as lead counsel in a breach of M&A agreement arbitration. The scope of my practice is quite broad and dynamic. I like to think that my training as a lawyer at S&C allows me to help clients with many of their legal issues.

How do you see this practice area evolving in the future?

In the IP space, I think we’re going to see a shift back to pro-patent and pro-inventor stances. Over the past decade, the patent laws have swung very much in favor of licensees or technology implementers, which has meant that patents have become easier to invalidate. I foresee us moving to a middle ground that is a bit more “patent-owner” friendly.

The antitrust space continues to evolve as well, and I tell associates this is an extremely interesting time to be an antitrust lawyer. Enforcers, for example, have become more aggressive—particularly on the merger clearance side—and regulators are starting to think more carefully about whether transactions should be cleared as industries continue to consolidate. The DOJ and FTC just published draft vertical
merger guidelines, for example, and the “Big Tech” investigations and surrounding discussions include grumblings of potential major changes to antitrust law in the not-too-distant future.

What are some typical career paths for lawyers in this practice area?

There are many different paths you can pursue. Intellectual property cases tend to be tried more frequently than other cases, and if you pursue a career in IP, you may end up becoming a first-chair trial attorney. Or, you may decide to focus on administrative actions—and practice before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board—or transactions. On the antitrust side, it’s very common to pursue a career in government and work on competition cases for the Antitrust Division or Federal Trade Commission. Many lawyers choose to stay in government and advance in those roles, but many also return to private practice with that experience under their belts.

Dustin Guzior, Partner—Litigation

Dustin Guzior is a partner in Sullivan & Cromwell’s Litigation group. His practice focuses on antitrust and intellectual property matters, as well as complex commercial disputes in arbitration proceedings and trials. He has represented clients in connection with merger clearance in a range of industries, including agriculture, pharmaceuticals, financial products and services, industrial equipment, energy semiconductor technology, and banking. Mr. Guzior also has represented clients in patent infringement, patent licensing, trade secret, and commodities and securities disputes. He has participated in trials before the bench, jury, and arbitral panels.

Additionally, Mr. Guzior’s pro bono service has included helping the ACLU invalidate as unconstitutional Arkansas’ de facto ban on adoption by same-sex couples and helping the ACLU to overturn North Carolina’s ban on marriage for same-sex couples. He also helped secure accommodations for a deaf prison inmate serving a life sentence in a federal penitentiary.

Mr. Guzior has been recognized as a New York Metro Rising Star by Super Lawyers (2019) and was named to the National LGBT Bar Association & Foundation “Best LGBTQ+ Lawyers Under 40” list (2019).

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