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Geologists

Overview

Geologists are geoscientists who study all aspects of the earth, including its origin, history, composition, and structure. Along more practical lines, geologists may, through the use of theoretical knowledge and research data, locate groundwater, oil, minerals, and other natural resources. They play an increasingly important role in studying, preserving, and cleaning up the environment. They advise construction companies and government agencies on the suitability of locations being considered for buildings, highways, and other structures including wind farms, geothermal power plants, and solar power plants). They also prepare geological reports, maps, and diagrams. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, there are approximately 31,800 geoscientists (including geologists, geophysicists, and oceanographers) employed in the United States.

Salary Range

$25,000 to $100,000+

Minimum Education Level

Bachelor's Degree

Certification/License

Required

Outlook

Faster than the Average
Personality Traits

Realistic

Scientific

Technical

Career Ladder
Project Leader or College Professor

Geologist

Research Assistant or Geological Technician

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