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Fast Food Workers

History

The continual development and improvement of transportation methods throughout history have made travel easier. While away from their homes and kitchens, these travelers needed places to eat. As a result, concepts in alternative dining facilities have multiplied. Early travel routes often took people through the centers of towns, where they would eat meals at hotels, inns, and taverns. When train layovers began to allow for meal breaks, food carts offering stews and quick dinners soon appeared near train depots. Longer scheduled train stops provided passengers with the opportunity to enjoy a more leisurely meal at local inns and diners.

After the turn of the century, train travel in the United States became more popular and efficient. Passengers commonly took much longer trips from state to state. At the same time, trains offered travelers good, reasonably priced meals in dining cars. When automobile travel became popular, small independent stands were built along roadsides, offering hurried travelers meals and sandwiches that were prepared and served quickly. With the development of highways and freeways, restaurants began thriving near exits and feeder roads.

Today, many well-known fast food franchises can be found both in metropolitan areas and dotted along highways throughout the United States. Many American restaurant chains have established themselves in countries around the world. The most famous is probably McDonald's although, historically, it is only the third-oldest food service restaurant chain in the United States. It opened in 1955.

In 1930, fried chicken was the specialty in a small Kentucky restaurant opened by a man named Colonel Sanders. By 1956, Sanders was promoting his own recipe throughout the area, and eventually his one-restaurant business became the famous Kentucky Fried Chicken, now known worldwide. The second-oldest fast food chain is Burger King, which was opened by the Burger King Corporation of Miami, Florida, in 1954.

Fast food has become increasingly popular because it fits into the busy schedules of most working families. In addition, restaurants are conveniently located, offer moderately priced meals, and serve a consistent, dependable food product. Many fast food restaurants offer certain price specials or discounts, such as "two-for-one" deals. Others offer prizes or hold contests that encourage repeat business. Responding to the widespread interest in more healthy lifestyles, some restaurants are supplementing their menus with food such as salads, soups, and low-fat items.