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by Vault Education Editors | March 03, 2011

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By Manhattan GMAT

In this article, part two of a three-part series, we will examine how an unreliable type of test-taker's intuition can disrupt your ability to answer Data Sufficiency and Sentence Correction questions. In part one, we covered the Draw a Conclusion question.

Data Sufficiency

More so than any other question type, Data Sufficiency epitomizes the tricky nature of the GMAT. One might think that Data Sufficiency questions should be easier than Problem Solving; after all you don't actually need to come up with an answer to the question - you simply need to decide if you have enough information to solve the question! However, the path to "deciding if you have enough information" is laden with many a trap. Let's focus our discussion of counter-intuition in Data Sufficiency on one such snare. READ MORE

Related: Counter-Intuition on the GMAT, Part 1: Draw a Conclusion

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