Overall Student Rating
4.7 of 5 stars (128 Ratings)

Rating Breakdown

5 Stars (113)
4 Stars (13)
3 Stars (2)
2 Stars (0)
1 Star (0)
Attend this School? Submit a Review
< Click Stars to Rate
  • < Click Stars to Rate
  • < Very Dissatisfied
  • < Dissatisfied
  • < Netural
  • < Satisfied
  • < Very Satisfied
Start Your Review ...

Want to Review a Different School?


Submit a Review and Get 7 FREE DAYS of Vault Gold

Displaying 21-30 of 128 Student Reviews

Sorted by:

4.8 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Both theory and practical; probably more theory than a lot of other places have (and most of us were happy with that). Class sizes generally small after the first year. Fairly collaborative/supportive atmosphere as law schools go. Faculty very approachable, supportive, willing to help.

Quality of Life

Cost of living is low. Great down, great campus. Small town, so very safe. Easy access to a major airport. School facilities are all very good (and will be better after the ongoing construction, the inconveniences of which were well managed by the administration).

Admissions

LSAT, a pretty standard application with a couple essays. No interviews.

4.8 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

The Socratic method is definitely still used in all 1L classes as well as in a few upper level classes. Most of my post 1L classes were smaller "seminar-style" classes which were less rigorous than a 1L class but in which the professors were able to bring out enough genuine participation without having to use the Socratic method, which was always much appreciated. I never found Michigan Law to be a competitive place, even during 1L. I was always a collaborative student that shared outlines and studied in groups for exams and found that there was lots of that going on around me. People don't talk about grades I found, except occasionally with friends.

Quality of Life

Wonderful! The Lawyer's Club is a perfect place to spend 1L year; a decent cafeteria and great opportunity to make friends with many of your 1L classmates right away. It's also a stone's throw away from the library and classes so you have everything you need! Off campus rent and the cost of living in general in Ann Arbor is very reasonable; you can $600-800ish a month for a nice apartment walking distance to campus and less for a room in a house or anything farther than walking distance. Ann Arbor is a perfect college town so there's lots of great cheap food very close to the law school as well as all nightlife options. I always felt very safe on and off campus.

Admissions

Michigan definitely seems to look at all the usual factors in admissions. I found that current students don't talk very much at all about what their LSAT scores or other qualifications were, but based on the few LSAT scores that I did know of among my friends, it seemed like Michigan has slightly broader range in scores among current students than other top schools. The application I remember being pretty straight forward, with the essay questions being fair. I didn't receive financial aid but know that a few of my friends with financial aid offers from other schools were able to easily talk about them with the admissions office and sometimes successfully negotiate a larger aid package than initially offered. I found out about my acceptance for fall semester quite early, which was nice, I remember earlier than most other schools I had applied to.

5.0 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

very theoretical in the standard instruction, however there are amazing clinical options for the practical side. There is a mix of Socratic and other teaching. Grading is similar to other schools, but not gold stars like the Yales of the word.

Quality of Life

Highish cost of living, but you are 1 minutes from the school. Ann Arbor is amazing! No crime, amazing cultural opportunities ranging from Shakespeare to midnight showings of The Room. Also, the new building and Lawyers Club upgrades should make this the most modern, yet beautiful campus in America.

Admissions

very standard application process

Level

2L

4.8 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Quality of classes: outstanding. All all teachers are humanistic, enthusiastic, practical, clear, inspired, brilliant, fun, kind.
Competitiveness: Students work hard, absorb the strain of the curve in a down economy well, without projecting hostility towards classmates via unproductive competitive/alpha attitudes. They display curiosity and engage their developing knowledge and interests in thoughtful conversations in the hallways, dining halls, etc. It's the kind of place where students will volunteer their notes if you have to miss a class.
Class sizes: 1L were mainly 100-person classes, which does not feel big. 1 class was 40.
Sure, it's a top school and it has notable faculty. Personally, I don't believe this speaks to a school's quality of teaching, but rather it's scholarship and prestige.
There are study-abroad opportunities, though I haven't looked into them, so I can't elaborate.
Socratic Method: Yes. All teachers used it in 1L to varying degrees. Some use it exclusively, most use it half the time, a couple used it infrequently. The SM provides a good incentive to read extremely carefully.
There are literally dozens of helpful meetings throughout the year to help students determine what courses or focus they might wish to pursue.

Quality of Life

COL is cheaper than a big city due to small-town locale. The gym, pool, jogging parks, computer labs, library, moot court, etc... are all excellent. The English Gothic campus is gorgeous. Plenty of variety in restaurants. We'd get occasional emails alerting us to robberies around campus... I assume this is typical of a large university, I don't know.

Admissions

Standard in terms of materials required for admission. However, I and many us noted amongst ourselves that the Dean of Admissions is particularly unique. She (Dean Zearfoss) goes above and beyond to communicate with the prospective students she is interested in admitting. Being married and living in a different state, for example, I had particular concerns about going to Michigan and she made every effort to help guide my decision. She also made every effort to ensure I'd attend certain Michigan Law events and discuss whatever concerns I had in person. Once I arrived at the university, Dean Zearfoss had lunch with me and many others and would occasionally check in and discuss or give feedback on opportunities we might be interested in (alumni connections, internship possibilities, ideas for journal notes, etc). She genuinely loves her work and that is amply evident.

Level

2L

4.8 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

I loved classes at Michigan. The professors are exceptionally accessible and brilliant. There is a general focus on theory but there are also seminars that allow for more practical application. Also, the clinical program is great, and a structured externship program (seminar paired with support in finding an externship placement) is offered periodically (approximately once per year). I didn't find it to be competitive at all, although that might be changing as the job market gets tougher. Most professors use the socratic method 1L year and in large, basic classes (evidence, crim pro, etc); it tapers off for upper-level classes and is nonexistent in seminars. There is a great externship program for students to work with NGOs in Geneva (Switzerland), although the number of students that can participate is limited. It seems that research opportunities exist, but generally students are approached by a professor rather than the other way around. Most of the classes I took were large (around 100 students), but each semester I had at least one smaller lecture or seminar; in my later semesters, a number of my classes were small. Getting into seminars can be competitive, and in some cases the professors get to pick their students, but students generally get most of the classes they want. The workload is tough, as it is at any law school, but students found ways of managing their stress and choosing a mix of classes such that it was manageable.

Quality of Life

Ann Arbor is a great place to live. It's not too expensive and housing options are varied. Housing right near campus is not that nice for the price (perhaps $800-$900 for a one-bedroom) but students that are willing to walk for 15 or 20 minutes might not be able to find a cheaper place, but they can find a nice one for the price. The campus is beautiful and the law quad is one of the most picturesque places I've ever seen. The library and computer labs are excellent. There is a moot courtroom that is used by clinical students and it is good, including advanced A/V capabilities. There is dorm housing that people seem to like, although it does not include kitchen facilities; I believe that the dorms are about to be renovated. The neighborhood is safe and fun, as campus is integrated with downtown Ann Arbor. Community relations, crime, and safety are all very good. In general, students are very happy.

Admissions

Michigan asked us to write an essay basically indicating why we wanted to go to law school. There was also an LSAT requirement. The admissions process was very standard. Financial aid seems to be generally in the form of merit scholarships and loans, although some students might also get need-based grants. It seems that merit scholarships are somewhat more available for in-state students. I received a merit scholarship in an amount equal to half the yearly tuition at the time I enrolled; this scholarship helped a lot but as tuition rose in my 2L and 3L years, the scholarship covered a decreasing share (as the scholarship did not go up each year).

5.0 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

I found the professors engaging in class and available outside of class. Class sizes were sufficiently large, and the reputation of the school sufficiently sound, that there was very little pressure to claw your way to #1. Colleagues were cooperative - sharing notes was the norm.

Quality of Life

I lived in the Lawyer's Club - on campus law student dorm - for two years. I found the environment very encouraging and friendly. It is a safe atmosphere, and the community dining experience is excellent for bringing law students together.

Admissions

I filled in an application, wrote several essays, took the LSAT and applied. I did not participate in financial aid/scholarships.

4.8 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

I enjoyed nearly all of my classes at Michigan. There was quite a mix of class formats to choose from--e.g., seminar, mini-seminar, large "traditional" classes, clinics, etc. I benefited from all types and would recommend that approach to other students as well.
I found the faculty to be extremely accessible and willing to help me in my day-to-day as well as my future endeavors---whether that might be finding a clerkship, searching for a summer position, or dealing with personal challenges.

Quality of Life

I loved Ann Arbor and enjoyed living off-campus all 3 years. The whole town centers around the university which results in a nice atmosphere.

Admissions

I believe that Michigan's admissions process is truly unique. They go past the seemingly all important, but yet of relatively little value, LSAT scores. The result is a very diverse, interesting, down-to-earth, and incredibly intelligent group of students. I learned not only from my professors but also from my peers. I was impressed at the incredible backgrounds of my peers--doctors, pharmacists, scientists, athletes, parents, artists, ....
Impressive scholarships are also offered which helps add to the mix of students.

5.0 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Michigan has a wide variety of classes in almost any discipline you can think of, ranging from large classes with professors who focus on theory and love the socratic method to tiny seminars, clinics, and practicums, where students get to engage in actual law practice (from clinic in tax, family law, environmental law, real estate, health law, or corporate work, to practicums in evidence, intellectual property, negotiation, and alternative dispute resolution). Following 1L year, I'd say 25-30% of courses are based on the socratic method.

Quality of Life

If you want to live near campus, Ann Arbor has surprisingly high rent--it is a university town, after all. However, prices drop rapidly as you move in any direction away from campus and/or consider taking on roommates. I spent my first year in the Lawyer's Club, the law school dormitory that wraps around two sides of the gorgeous law quad. The Lawyer's Club is not for everybody (you do sleep in twin extra long beds and eat your meals out of the dining hall), but I wouldn't trade my experience living there for anything. It created an incredible sense of community among the ~50% of the 1L class living there and allowed me to make friends out of my immediate section. Meal times became a welcome break from the hub bub of school, I was able to eat fresh fruit and vegetables without out when and how I was going to get a car to go to the grocery store, and the dining hall staff was very receptive (even acquiescing with my request to add Honey Bunches of Oats to the cereal bar). I spent my third year in the Kerrytown historic district, a quick 15 minute walk but worlds away from the more "fratty" undergraduate areas immediately adjacent to campus. In Kerrytown, I had the farmers market, the natural foods coop, a small grocery store, a wine store, a few bars, some asian restaurants, a coffee shop, and the famed Zingerman's Delicatessen all within a two minute walk. It was also a stone's throw from the trails around Argo pond, and closer to the State Street and Main Street eating and drinking establishments. Ann Arbor is not a New York or Chicago by any stretch of the imagination, but it is a vibrant college town with two independent movie theaters and an awesome performance lineup each semester. I definitely could have seen more of town with a car, but was able to function quite well with just my own two feet and a bicycle.

Admissions

I received an application fee waiver via LSAC, which encouraged me to apply. I don't recall any unique application questions or essays, but I did receive a scholarship offer with my admissions offer, which was nice.

5.0 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

The majority of first year courses are taught in bigger sections. However, after those are completed, the remaining classes are smaller seminar types. The professors who teach these classes all have come from top level clerkships, and have the predicate professional experience to make their classes even more relevant.

Quality of Life

This place is very much a community atmosphere. In my time at the law school I have not had a negative experience with staff, administration, students or professors.

Admissions

I had to submit a personal statement, diversity essay, LSAT, and LSAC reports.

4.8 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Classes and professors are generally excellent. Overall, academics are easily the best of any school I've attended. Professors are also extremely devoted to teaching and very available to students. Workload and classroom expectations are rigorous but manageable. Lots of variety in classes offered, so it's easy to specialize in lots of interesting areas, or just explore various facets of the law.

Level

Other