Overall Student Rating
3.6 of 5 stars (12 Ratings)

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Displaying 1-10 of 12 Student Reviews

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4.3 of 5 stars

2010 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

The quality of the classes is very high, the faculty is second to none, the class sizes are comparable to most schools, and the grading is rigorous, but fair.

Quality of Life

The quality of life is very high; students are extremely friendly and the faculty is collegial and helpful to students.

Admissions

LSAT, GPA, Essay, Etc.

Graduation Year

2010

3.8 of 5 stars

2010 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

My largest class my first year was around 80 students. My Contracts class only had around 40. It really depends on how many professors are on sabbatical. During my three years the school went through three deans but in my last year I believe that some stabilization is occuring. The school has introduced a new visting professor program where young alumni will come back to the school and teach for two years. The school has a wide range of distingushed professors, from the essential author of Kentucky's evidence and criminal laws to the 6th circuit reporter for criminal jury instructions. Many of the professors may be older but they have great passion for their topics.
As far as competitiveness that's just an element of law school. There is a difference between arrogant competitiveness and modest hardwork that you will find at any law school. For the most part students are friendly and work well together. Most people are not going to be in the top of the class yet after graduation most everyone will be praciticing together within the state.
The school is starting a study abroad for a semester program next year in London, England!
There is one legal clinic which admits anywhere between 15-20 students a semester. Considering that there are over 120 students in most classes the majority of students will not get clinical experience. However, the school does offer a variety of externship programs and if you really want to get some practical experience you will have an opprotunity to do so.

Quality of Life

Lived in an apartment with two roommates within walking distance.

Admissions

From what I recall I applied to the school in late fall of 2007 after I received my October LSAT results. I took the LSAT twice because in 2007 LSAC announced that law schools were going to quit averaging scores and just review the highest score. I saw this as a win/win situation so I tried the LSAT again to see if I could improve my score. I took no LSAT prep class and essentially burned out after the June LSAT. I did not study as much nor as effectively during the second time I took the LSAT and my scores reflected such. Sometime in February I received notice from the school that I was on the hold list. In essence I did not stand out as a candidate for admissions and the school wanted me to supplement my application with additional letters of recommendation. I believe that I got two additional letters of recommendation and was accepted in late March or early April.
I highly recommend applying as early as the admissions process begins at the school. Not only do less people apply at the begining but you also have a better chance of getting a substantial scholarship. Study hard for the LSAT in the spring and get all your information in ASAP.

Graduation Year

2010

4.0 of 5 stars

2010 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

The classes for the first year were very good. A good mix of theory and practical study. The socratic method was used extensively. The academic advising could be a little better. The class sizes were reasonable and it was very competitive, but friendly. There was a weekly academic success program. We have a faculty member who was a clerk for Justice Souter

Quality of Life

Cost of living - low. Library/building - A little old. Moot courtroom - good. Crime and safety is not too bad.

Admissions

LSAT average is about 154. There was a decent amount of financial aid andscholarship opportunities

Level

1

Graduation Year

2012

3.8 of 5 stars

2010 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Grading is based on one end-of-the-year exam; professors utilize the Socratic Method in different ways (some via flashcards, etc); professor offices are always open

Quality of Life

The law building does not provide housing, there there is reasonable housing nearby (many within walking distance). There is campus security and they notify us of any crime in the area. The people are friendly and I cannot have imagined myself anywhere else.

Admissions

Unique essay, LSAT, and GPA

Level

3

Graduation Year

2011

3.5 of 5 stars

2010 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

The academics at UK Law are rigorous, but if you are willing to put in the appropriate time, they are not too difficult. First year courses focus on theory from case books. Practical study is near non existant in the first year law curriculum. This does make getting a job during your first summer rather difficult. The academic advising is excellent. The 1L class size for the class of 2012 is 149. The students at UK Law are competitive, but still willing to help each other. A student may be able to find a position researching with the faculty during a summer. The grades are all given on a curve so that you are graded against everyone else in your class. Study abroad programs are available with the newest being the opportunity to study in London, England. The workload is heavy. One should plan to spend several hours each night studying for the next days classes. Being a law student will take more hours each day than working a 40 hour per week job.

Quality of Life

The cost of living is reasonable. The campus is pretty nice, but the law building is old and not in the best condition. The law library is okay, but there are no computer labs in the law building, the nearest one is a 5-10 minute walk away. There is a moot courtroom, but you can only get snacks in the law school - you have to go somewhere else to get meals. Crime and safety are not usually an issue on the UK campus. Overall happiness of law students is mediocre. Everyone has good days and bad days.

Admissions

You must submit your application through LSDAS - this must include both your LSAT scores and law school application. You want to make sure your personal statement has a "hook" to it. Perhaps explain why you want to be a lawyer, but be sure you tell an interesting story that illustrates who you are.

Level

2

Graduation Year

2012

3.7 of 5 stars

2010 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Quality of Life

Cost of living is reasonable. Facilities are all fine.

Admissions

Standard process. LSAT, one essay and submitted through LSDAS. Attachments accepted to explain qualifications for diversity scholarship.

Level

2

Graduation Year

2012

3.3 of 5 stars

2010 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Three fourths of the professors at UK College of Law are wonderful. They care about students, and they enjoy teaching. The remaining one fourth, however, are lackluster. All professors seem to utilize the Socratic method. In the three years I attended UK the externship and internship opportunities were increasing, which was great to see. Now the writing opportunities need to increase in number and quality.

Quality of Life

Lexington is a fairly expensive area, but it is possible to live within a reasonable budget. The College of Law has seminars for prospective students regarding housing, and they do send out information during the summer about housing opportunities (where law students live, roommate possibilities, etc).
The actual law building is less than desirable, but the school does what it can to make it work. They have greatly improved the classrooms with new technology, and they have recently renovated to increase the group study areas at the school. One concern is the lack of restricted computer space. The College of Law sits on a main street in downtown Lexington, and is near many other professional schools. For this reason many citizens and pharmacy/medical students use the law school library and computers. At times it is difficult to find an available computer to use.

Admissions

The admissions process seems to be fairly standard. You submit an application, your personal essay, transcript, and letters of recommendation. They do seem to do a good job of weighing lower LSAT scores with other good applicant qualities, so that those with mediocre LSAT scores who have other strong qualities are admitted (i.e. those who intend to focus on a certain area of law).

Graduation Year

2007

3.5 of 5 stars

2010 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Admissions

The admissions process is fairly standard. It is necessary to complete an application form, register for the LSDAS, take the LSAT, submit undergraduate and graduate (if any) transcripts, submit two letters of recommendation, complete a personal statement, and submit a resume (optional). The application form includes a section regarding scholarships and asks students to provide a statement or include information relevant to their consideration.

Graduation Year

2010

3.7 of 5 stars

2010 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

pretty competitive, finals are based on speed

Quality of Life

incredible library --> William T Young
UK parking and transportation services is terribly run; the most unreasonable organization I have ever dealt with

Admissions

LSAT, personal statement, application

Level

1

Graduation Year

2012

3.0 of 5 stars

2010 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Overall, the professors are pretty outstanding in most respects - accomplished and interesting. They've nailed the Socratic method, too, and provide many research opportunities for willing students. Other than that, however, UK Law's academics are pretty unimpressive. There was very little opportunity for practical learning. Students who wanted to study abroad got no help from the Dean's office and only a little help from the university. The only academic advising I recall was the annual meeting with the entire student body at which the dean of academics read off the course list and invited a handful of professors to speak about their classes and areas of law. I guess the main problem with the professors is that most of them have no interest in getting involved with studends outside of class. They aren't interested in advising or sponsoring student activities. Their primary focus is their own research and writing.

Quality of Life

The cost of living isn't high, but UK Law's facilities are pretty dismal. The building is ancient, the carpet was held together by duct tape, and there was no computer lab. UK's entire campus is not particularly safe, and it's enormous. We didn't feel like part of the UK community, though, which was probably a good thing.
Most law students were pretty miserable.
Lexington, however, is a great town for a young person and a young professional. There's always something interesting going on - gallery hops, live performances (theater, dance, music, etc.), college and professional sports, great parks, and of course wine and bourbon tastings. It's also small enough that networking outside of school is easy and fun.

Admissions

It was very straightforward - standard essay about why I wanted to be a lawyer and attend UK, LSAT scores, letters of recommendation, etc. The scholarship deadline was sometime in March. There's an interview for the two biggest scholarships, but otherwise interviews are not required.

Graduation Year

2008

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