Overall Student Rating
4.3 of 5 stars (3 Ratings)

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Displaying 1-3 of 3 Student Reviews

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Good Education; Lots of Students

4.0 of 5 stars

January 2016 | FORMER STUDENT

Uppers

Flexibility in 2L and 3L curriculum - you are offered multiple classes to satisfy certain requirements, and those classes are often different. For example, in my year, you either had to take ConLaw II or CrimPro. There aren't many hard and fast requirements, either (e.g. business organizations is not a required course), so you have a lot of latitude.

Downers

There are a lot of students in each year (compared to other law schools). While they try to create a smaller-school "feel" by subdividing each of the four 100-student sections into 25-person groups. These groups range in how close they are; some are like families, others loosely associated with each other. Life, especially in the first half of 1L year, can be really difficult if you end up in a group you don't fit in with (or that generally isn't a good fit for everyone), as you have all of your classes with the people in your small section.

One other downside: like many schools ranked in the top 20 or so, some professors focus almost exclusively on a highly theoretical, philosophical and academic manner, spending little or no time attempting to explain the practical implications of the subject matter in the context of the actual practice of law.

Comments

Especially for in-state students, UT Law is a great value, particularly considering the school ranking and the fact that it is generally well-regarded.

If you plan on staying in Texas after law school, UT Law is an even more solid choice, as many alumni tend to choose candidates that (1) received their undergraduate degree from a Texas school (this is more of a "plus" than a general rule, and there are definitely exceptions -- say, if you went to Harvard), and (2) are attending law school that they attended. It gives you a step up on some other schools, particularly those with graduates that tend to geographically disperse after graduating, and also provides a ready-to-use network of potential employers who you can interact with and get to know at various events as soon as you start school (while being mindful of the Nov. 1 starting-line for applications). You do, however, have to be proactive -- no one is going to force you to go to a reception, and some aren't well-publicized, so do your best to stay current on what's going on.

Would You Recommend

Yes

Opened all the doors I needed opened

5.0 of 5 stars

June 2015 | CURRENT STUDENT

Uppers

Relaxed atmosphere; Excellent professors; the challenging environment; Working in Texas.

Downers

The weather is not always great, and Austin traffic is terrible. Also, I think they let in some pretty poorly qualified applicants.

Comments

The opportunities for Big law are great, but some of the other possible career paths can be more difficult to obtain here.

Would You Recommend

Yes

Good school

4.0 of 5 stars

March 2015 | FORMER STUDENT

Uppers

Easy access to professors and lots of opportunities for clinics and other real world practice opportunities.

Downers

A party school, even at the law school, so if a law student does not favor drinking regularly as social activity, it is a bit hard to socialize.

Comments

This is a great learning environment at a top 15 school, without the similar competitive pressures of other Northeastern schools. However, socialization is centered on drinking culture. Additionally, Austin is a fun city, but not very cultured or diverse.

Would You Recommend

Yes