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4.3 of 5 stars (143 Ratings)

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Displaying 31-40 of 143 Student Reviews

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4.5 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

We have a distribution requirement that students have to take two classes in five different topics (mathematical sciences, natural sciences, social sciences, arts, humanities). It is very, very easy to fulfill these requirements and students can use some AP or IB credits too. There is a language requirement for all arts and sciences students - six semesters and this can be intimidating. However, it is a requirement that is not as bad as it seems. It can be fulfilled in three ways: six semesters of one language, three semesters of one language and three semesters of another language or three semesters of a language and three culture classes that coordinate with that language. Most majors require 10 classes which is very easy to achieve since the average student will take 34 classes before graduation. The student body is not competitive with each other; most students are just competitive with their self. That makes for a very productively academic environment that is not cutthroat at all. The average class size is 20 students, although some introductory classes will be very large. If its a large class, it will break down into smaller discussions sections. Tufts has eleven different study abroad programs and also accepts credits from many other programs. Students are really encouraged to go abroad and 60% will go abroad at some point during their time at Tufts. Students get assigned to a pre-major advisor upon matriculation and once they declare their major they can pick their own advisor within that department.

Quality of Life

The dorms on campus are really great and there are a variety of different living styles available.

Admissions

The Tufts admissions process is very unique and elicits different information than normal applications so that we can learn more about the students applying. It is lengthy and unfortunately that alone sometimes scares students away from applying. The application includes the Common Application and several supplemental essays. These essays are fun to write, though! They can be silly prompts or an opportunity to write a short non-fiction story or a chance to add something more about yourself. And the optional essay actually is optional! It doesn't change anything about your application if you complete it or not.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2013

4.7 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

I've taken some great classes at Tufts so far-- "Documentary Filming" and "Contemporary Crises in Africa" were probably my two favorite ones thus far. The class sizes are often small/medium sized, which I prefer, and even the larger ones aren't overwhelming in size. I've been able to meet with my professors outside of class without any problem-- overall, I'd say there is a very good sense of connection between students, teachers and peers at Tufts.

Quality of Life

Tufts has a great location and campus. I was happy living in my all-freshmen dorm my first year, enjoyed the food in the dining halls, and spent a lot of my time in the Tisch Library, which has a great working environment. I play a lot of basketball at both the outdoor courts by South Hall and in Cousens Gym. Being always able to play pickup basketball makes me happy.

Admissions

Tufts was one of several schools I applied to. I visited the campus in August 2009 and was very impressed. I went to an information session hosted by the Dean of Admissions, Lee Coffin, in Septemer 2009, and then finally decided to apply. It took me a few days of typing and editing to finish my application essays and compile other application materials, such as my 10-minute video portfolio. I liked a lot of the essays though-- especially one imagining how history would have unfolded had the colonists lost the American Revolution-- and sent in all my material by the Regular Decision deadline in late December. I had an interview with a Tufts alum, Brian Wolly, in January, and was very excited when I received my acceptance letter in late March.

Level

2

Graduation Year

2014

4.7 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Great study abroad programs and internship opportunities, some core requirements, assigned pre-major advisers and chosen major advisers, accessible professors, really tough grading

Admissions

Unique optional essay question in addition to 2 short essay questions that are not on the common app, early decision, no required interview, optional youtube video essay, need-based financial aid

Level

3

Graduation Year

2012

4.3 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

If you came from a high school that allowed you to take AP's/IB, then you're going to have more freedom in picking your courses because they cover a lot of the general requirements. However, I found out along the way that many courses (often the ones for your major) can fulfill these. Most majors require around 11 courses, but not all of them are specific required courses, so you do have a decent amount of wiggle room to take what is most interesting to you. With advising, I recommend getting to know your advisor well and early because they can be very helpful in giving you advice on your courses/major/study abroad etc. Also, they can write you a nice recommendation letter! Professors are generally fairly accessible because they have required office hours (usually twice a week) and if you can't be free at those times, then you can just email them to set up an appointment. It's almost better to have an appointment so you don't have to feel rushed when you're talking to them (because during office hours, often many students are waiting to see the professor). I believe Tufts is underrated in its research opportunities. The majority of students participate in some form of research during their four years here, and it is not too difficult to find such opportunities. They are also quite rewarding (for me, I learned that I would like to never do research again, but it was an invaluable experience). Regarding competitiveness, the most aggressive kids are in the International Relations program (since it's one of the nation's best schools for the field, it attracts some of the best students). Beyond that, however, most students aren't really competitive with each other (they are very nice and encourage each other to do well). Instead, they are competitive with themselves, pushing themselves to stay up til three in the morning at the library five days a week, play a varsity sport, and work three jobs (I actually know someone who does this). Grading is very inconsistent across teachers. Unlike many Ivy Leagues (sorry to diss you, but you deserve it sometimes), Tufts does not have grade inflation. So, things can be harsh for kids who work hard in a class, yet still don't do very well. Some classes are a cake walk, while others give out one A a semester. We have some great faculty, and there's pretty much guaranteed a few fantastic and relatively famous professors in each department. Sol Gittleman is so entertaining, Joseph Hurka is inspirational, and Paola Servino is invigorating, to name a few. Tufts has one of the best study abroad programs in the nation because it is so comprehensive, and for the International Relations students, it flows very well with their major. The Tufts programs themselves are fantastic, yet they do not exist in as many countries as students often wish. But, Tufts deals with this very nicely. They do an absolutely fantastic job of getting students connected with non-Tufts programs in basically every country in the world and making the transition smooth, easy, and understandable. Workload can be quite hefty at Tufts, and most of the people I know are stressed out 90% of the time. However, it does depend on your own work ethic and coping strategies. I, for instance, do not spend hours upon hours in the library cramming almost every night (I do my work consistently in small bursts), yet so many people do. Lastly, even if people work hard, they play harder! We like to have fun too!

Quality of Life

Housing is kind of a mixed bag because during freshman year, you get randomly assigned to dorms, and then afterwards you get to pick rooms based on lottery numbers. So, you could get lucky and get assigned to a good dorm first year and then get a good lottery number, or you could get bad luck and live in not so nice dorms. Cost of living is pretty much the same as it is anywhere. You don't have to spend any more money than you are already spending on tuition (especially freshman year, with the unlimited meal plan). When you get older and live off campus, housing can get kind of expensive, but if you search well, you can find the right place for the right price. The campus is very beautiful because it is on a hill overlooking Boston. It has lots of trees and is not too big or too far from downtown. The facilities are somewhat lagging behind those of other schools similar to ours. As someone said, we are a "first-rate institution with third-rate facilities". This is partially true because we are consistently improving our facilities, and I think they are doing a very good job at it. The library, dining halls, and music center are all new and improved, whereas they are still upgrading the gym, campus center, and dorms. The library is huge and is a great place for many people to study (both alone and in groups) and it even has a little cafe so you never have to leave. The food is fantastic at Tufts, no matter what other people say to the contrary (they are just spoiled). You have to remember, this is a dining hall after all. They can't give you as much attention as a 4 star restaurant. There is a lot of variety in the food and it is usually of very good quality. The immediate neighborhood is inhabited by Tufts upperclassmen and graduate students, and then beyond that there are locals, who we don't interact with much. Davis Square, which is only a ten minute walk away, is very nice and has plenty of good places to eat and hang out. We connect with the community a lot, whether it be working with the Somerville Homeless Coalition or tutoring at the local elementary schools. Tufts is rated one of the most dangerous campuses, but that is a misconception. That rating, calculated by the Daily Beast, includes the Tufts graduate schools, which are located in Chinatown, not a very safe neighborhood. The Tufts campus is much safer than that area, but it is not quite a haven. You always have to be careful and watchful, and don't walk around alone (on the edges of campus) at night. Students are rated as some of the happiest in the country, and I definitely think it is true. Everyone loves the school and is really involved in pretty much everything. People are generally very nice and like to support each other.

Admissions

Tufts is consistently at the forefront of getting creative and interesting answers out of students, whether it be with their open questions or their YouTube video supplement. You can get an interview, but they are not guaranteed and you have to request them. I had one in my hometown and it was fairly comprehensive; I believe it can only help you. The rest of the application was fine because we got to use the common app. I applied early decision 1 (there are two early decision periods, but I don't think there is early action) because I was 100% sure I wanted to go. I feel like many people apply early without feeling as confident in their choice as they should. A large portion of Tufts students receive financial aid, and it used to be need blind, but with the economic crisis (Tufts lost a lot of money with Madoff) it has become more and more difficult to get proper financial aid. There are a good number of scholarship opportunities and you have to work hard to receive them, but it's definitely worth it in the end.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2013

4.7 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

General requirements: 2 arts, 2 humanities, 2 world civilization, 2 english, 2 mathematics, 6 language/culture.

Additional requirements added for any majors or minors one may pursue.

Quality of Life

Housing is clean and well maintained. Outdoors, the buildings are beautiful. Indoors, they're somewhat old. The campus is lovely and located very close to the center of Boston. We are far enough away that we have limited crime and relative insulation when it comes to studying, but close enough that we can go in every day of the week with minimal cost or effort, if we choose.

The food is outstanding. We have amazing choices every day, much of it sustainable. We always feature food with the highest quality/health characteristics.

Admissions

Tufts requires four or five essays instead of the standard 2 or 3. They have alumni interview prospective students, area student gatherings, on campus tours and several other behavioral review situations. They look for creativity and achievement in all areas of pursuit, not simply academia. We have two binding early decision application deadlines, we use the common application, and financial aid and scholarships are available. If you feel you have not been offered enough financial aid, you can consult our officers for more. Generally, they are very helpful in assisting students in need.

Level

4

Graduation Year

2013

4.5 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Academics are challenging and students work hard to do well and learn a lot in classes. In many classes professors have extremely high expectations of students.

Quality of Life

Campus living is very engaging and there is a lot to do, enough so there is no need to go in to Boston if one does not want to. Additionally, almost everything is free on campus.

Admissions

The admissions process involves the common application, required Tufts specific essays and optional additional essays, in addition to an alumni interview. All of the Tufts specific essay questions are incredibly interesting to write and think about.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2012

4.3 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

They push you, a lot. They expect a lot of you but if you put in the work, you'll do well.

Quality of Life

Students has a lot of pride in going to tufts. The facilities are decent but definitely could use some work.

Admissions

Common app. They really want to get to know you from their supplemental application.

Level

2

Graduation Year

2013

4.5 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

The classes are challenging, but exciting and definitely manageable. The faculty is exceptionally enthusiastic and eager to help and talk. The school is extremely supportive of study abroad even if you have a demanding major, and most students do study abroad. Professor encourage collaboration, and most students are happy to help and work with you on an assignment. There are distribution requirements, but no real required courses.

Quality of Life

I'd say overall happiness is pretty high. The food is great (especially for vegetarians) and the dorms are pretty good. Community relations are at a high. Crime hasnt been a big problem.

Admissions

The common app and a supplement are required to apply. There are two rounds of (binding) early decision- one in the fall and one in the spring. The supplement has a couple of short essays (that are really fun to write) and an optional essay.

Level

2

Graduation Year

2014

4.7 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

There are quite a few requirements but they are all doable. Each Tufts student has to take 6 language or culture classes. Most majors have about 10-11 classes to complete the major. Freshmen are assigned an adviser and once they declare their major they can choose their own adviser. The biggest introduction classes can be up to 300 people but classes get smaller very quickly. Senior seminars can be about 10 people. Professors are accessible if you seek them. Students are more competitive with themselves then with each other. There are many study abroad options including Tufts and non-Tufts programs. The workload is generally pretty heavy but it depends on your classes.

Admissions

There are multiple extra essay questions for Tufts. With early decision you have a better shot of getting in.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2012

4.3 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Tufts is a liberal arts institution (we have an engeneering school as well!) but for LA kids we have a braod spectrum of general requirements you have to take or place out of with AP/BAC credit. English 1 & 2. 6 semesters of a language (3 of actual language, 3 of culture), 2 social sciences, 2 natural sciences, 2 mathmatics, 2 arts and 2 humanities. They are relatively easy to fullfill and you will probably end up doing so without really realizing it. Majors tend to be around 10 classes in a specific area and minors tend to be around 6. You are assigned a random academic advisor when you get there as a freshman but as soon as you declare your major you can choose whoever you want within your specific field. Intro classes tend to be big, but you get through them pretty quickly and then Tufts classes tend to be pretty intimate, anywhere between 10-50 students. Professors are really accessible if you make an effort. It is easy to go all four years never having really talked to any or becoming close friends with a few, it depends on your initiative. They are always willing to help and to meet outside of class. Also, Tufts will remburse any coffee date you have with a professor if you show them a receipt! Overall, tufts is a very academic school with students who work very hard and yet people are not competitve at all. Everyone understands that each person here is smart so it doesn't really matter. More importantly everyone does other amazing things and loves to talk and share it, that's way more important. Tufts is a pretty international school especially because of the Fletcher school, so study abroad is quite common. Most people will go abroad at some point in their Junior years. There are quite a few Tufts run programs but you can just as easily got hrough an outside organization to pretty much anywhere you could think of. The workload is not light, club tisch is the beloved library that you can almost always find a familiar face in. That being said it is also very easy to have a fun and active social life!

Quality of Life

I love my school. That being said some of the buildings could use some renovations. I highly recomend all freshman living your first year and it tends to be incredibly social. Living close to Boston is also AMAZING because you have easy access to a city while still being able to have a central campus. There are a lot of great food places around, especially in davis square (BBQ, Mexican, Italien, Burgers, Ice Cream, Indian ect) and Harvard sqaure is only two stops on the red line. Tufts tries to get involed in community projects but to be honest most of the time I'm not really aware of the neighborhood folks around. Tufts was ranked as the most dangerous campus in the US, this is SO FALSE. I have never felt unsafe and TUPD is always available at any time of night if you need a ride or anything else/ The dinning halls may be one of the best things at Tufts, huge selection, delicious food and a lot of effort towards organic. there are also a lot of speciality and themed nights which are always fun! Overall happiness at Tufts...couldn't be better :)

Admissions

The reason I loved Tufts so much was because they made an effort to make the application process about the individual and not about the numbers. The application essays and questions are very unique and quirky. Also, the optional essays are geared towards every kind of interest. There is a question for the history buff, the science kid, the creative artist ect. Besides the Tufts specific application there is the Common App and an optional interview. They have two rounds of early decision. The financial aid app consists of the FAFSA, the CSS Profile and a Tufts specific application. I have been on financial aid all years of undergraduate and have had a good experience with it. They are willing to listen and help as much as they can.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2012