Overall Student Rating
4.3 of 5 stars (143 Ratings)

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Displaying 21-30 of 143 Student Reviews

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4.5 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

distribution requirements in humanities, sciences, math, art, world civilization, english
10 classes req per major (at least). pre-major then major advisor. small language classes, large intro classes. Letter grading, very competitive, research opportunities in every major. one third of juniors go abroad every year. Large workload

Quality of Life

Housing much like any other college, beautiful campus, fantastic library and dining, nearby major square for needs not met on campus, growing crime incident rate with mugging, but an overall great atmosphere with happy students

Admissions

Essay - One "you", one unique, one optional.
Interview
There are two early decision option
It is not a common app school
financial aid for only a certain bracket
no adacemic scholarships, but sports and financial

Level

4

Graduation Year

2012

4.5 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Admissions

Tufts supplement

Level

2

Graduation Year

2014

4.7 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

There are a ton of requirements to fulfill--2 semesters of a freshman writing requirement, 2 natural science, 2 humanities, 2 social science, 2 mathematics, 1 culture class, and 6 semesters of a language. I was able to get AP credits for humanities/social science, but these are the subjects that I'm majoring in so this didn't really help. It was a pain to do all the math and science when I didn't want to, so I tried to find "easy" courses for non-majors. The 6 semesters of a language sounds like a lot, but it is easy to waive out of at least a couple if you have taken a foreign language in high school. If, like me, you plan to major in International Relations, you will need 8 semesters of a language. If you stick with spanish, french, or a language you took in high school, then you won't spend your entire college career with the language. But if you start fresh, say with Arabic or Chinese, you will need to take it every semester. There are lots of study abroad opportunities, both through Tufts-run programs and other pre-approved options. About half of the junior class studies abroad each year. Grading is fair and there doesn't seem to be a ridiculous amount of inflation (or, on the other hand, deflation), but some of the intro "weed out" courses have a more rigid grade distribution than upper-level seminars. Workload is about what I expected coming in--classes are equivalent to AP courses in high school (or at least in my highly-competitive public high school). If you care about a class, you will want to work for it.

Quality of Life

Facilities aren't great at Tufts--it is disappointing that Tufts hasn't put the money into improving its dorms, especially to compete with schools of a similar caliber that have worked hard in recent years to update dorm living. Overall, though, it's not about the buildings and Tufts students are generally very happy here. The campus is warm, friendly, and inviting, and it is likely you will run into at least 3 people you know on the way to class, which says a lot about our "not too big, but not too small" vibe. The library is spacious and modern, and is somewhat of a social hub on campus, especially during midterms and finals seasons. I have grown to absolutely love the neighborhood--Medford and Somerville are down to earth and filled with tons of fun activities, restaurants, and nightlife. And Boston is right at our fingertips, and I tend to go in a lot. Yes, there is some crime in the surrounding area, but I don't think that is uncommon for an area like this. I walk around with groups of people at night and feel totally safe.

Admissions

Tufts requires the Common App, and has an additional supplement. Tufts' supplement was the longest that I completed (I applied to 15 schools of similar caliber). The supplement has 4-5 additional questions that cover a diverse range of topics, and the optional essay has a bunch of different quirky topics to focus on. Students even have the opportunity to create a 1 minute youtube video for the office of admissions to evaluate. Tufts has ED1, ED2, and regular decision cycles. Interviews are only conducted with alumni off campus and do not hold much, if any, weight in the admissions process. They are more informative than evaluative.

Level

2

Graduation Year

2013

4.5 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

There are a lot of requirements, including 6 language classes, but students can fill requirements with interesting classes. The professors I have taken classes with have been for the most part interested in their work, interesting as instructors, and available after class. That last point's been awesome--professors at Tufts really care about their students.

Their is a lot of work, but it is worth it because students learn a lot.

Admissions

I submitted the Common App and a supplement. The supplement included questions like "Who are you?" and an optional creative question. The creative questions included "Kermit the Frog says it's not easy being green. Do you agree?" I wrote a short story entitled "The Getaway" for the supplement.

Level

4

Graduation Year

2014

4.3 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Admissions

Unique essays, no interview, early decision available

Graduation Year

2011

4.3 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

The work is hard! The professors demand nothing but the best, and the students around you are the best, so its impossible to get by with any mediocre work. I have been in a lot of courses with severe grade deflation - i.e., a professor telling a class of one hundred students at the beginning of the semester, "I will not give out more than a few A's this semester, if any". For that course, there were only 6 A's at the end of the semester. I have learned a lot from my courses, though even the large intro ones, and I don't think that the grade deflation hurts much.

Most students enter into Tufts pretty concerned about their GPA and intending to get a 4.0, but after the first year when they realize it's not possible, they figure out that the learning is more important than the grades. In fact, that's something I like about Tufts. People care about the learning a lot more than they care about the grades.

Also, academically speaking, Tufts is a great community. I've never really experienced "competition" in any of my classes among my peers; it's always a collaborative effort. Students always work together and help each other out, even when they know that their work will be judged against one another's. No one ever forms the students into study groups, but they just coagulate because they like learning and they like spending time with each other. Students don't really compare grades with one another, and the students that do well don't have bad attitudes about it. Academically speaking, Tufts is a good natured place.

The class sizes are great. Big classes for intro courses, small classes for seminars, and smaller classes for languages.

Tufts language education is awesome. I love being at a place where people are required to take a language. It makes the student body so much more interesting, and at the same time, it gives the language program a strong sense of importance on campus. Almost everyone (except the engineers) leaves campus with memories of hours spent in the language building. The professors, the courses, the teaching methods, the study abroad programs all help our language program to be excellent.

I really like the Tufts integration of academic and practical knowledge. In both the classroom and the student activities arena, the importance of the blending of these types of knowledge is always made clear, and it really enriches the student experience.

Tufts is a great place. Every day, I realize once again how lucky I am to be there.

Quality of Life

I love it. Everything is great. The facilities are a little old, and the dining halls do have lousy hours (they close too late on week nights and open too late on weekends), and the gym is a little cramped, but overall, I love the campus, the trees, the buildings, the libraries, the neighborhood, and the people. Tufts is great.

Admissions

We had to fill out the Common App and a special supplement. I think that the nature of the Tufts supplement made me really like the school. It was funny, quirky, and it seemed like it asked questions that would help the admissions officers get to know me in a real way. It was the most enriching application experience of my senior year.

Level

2

Graduation Year

2013

4.3 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Huge workload but great faculty....For Engineering Studens, yiu have 38 classes to satisfy graduation requirements and foe Liberal arts, 32. However, students may have fewer requirements to satisfy if they have pre-matriculation credits (APs, IBs e.t.c.)

Quality of Life

You would be happy for your choice! No room for regrets!

Admissions

Intense application. Lots of essays. Great Financial aid package!

Level

2

Graduation Year

2014

4.7 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

The level of intensity depends on the student and can be found any department.

Quality of Life

Excellent quality of life, safe as long as you are smart.

Admissions

Early decision essay, followed by a regular application process.

Level

4

Graduation Year

2011

4.5 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

It's kind of a pain to get all the distribution requirements out of the way, but I was able to get out of about half of them with A.P. credits so that was really useful, although I'm not sure how much longer they're going to continue with that policy. It worked out nicely, though, to get all of my distribution requirements out of the way freshman and sophomore years and it allowed me to experiment with really interesting classes I wouldn't have taken otherwise. That being said, I am still quite happy I can now focus solely on the classes I'll be taking for my majors. There are a lot of research opportunities, and not just in the sciences as you might expect. I have a friend who is an international relations major, and he did research in Bangladesh over winter break our freshman year (he had been at school for 1 semester and still had an amazing research opportunity.) Not gonna lie, the workload seems to get heavier with time and I pulled more all-nighters this last semester than I thought possible. That being said, a lot of those all-nighters were because I spent time trying to balance an on-campus job and a social life with my school-work, but I think that fun-work balance is going to be a challenge wherever you go. And as far as study abroad, I think 40-60% of the junior class goes abroad every year. Tufts has some awesome programs, and you can do non-Tufts programs as well. Just be forewarned that the study abroad office tends to make a lot of things way more difficult than they have to be; they aren't very good about communicating and tend to leave things for the last minute.

Quality of Life

The dorms on campus aren't great, but I've found it's more about the people you live with than the building you're living in. Living on campus is probably more expensive than living off campus, but you're required to live on campus your first two years so you don't really have a choice. I think the most expensive part about it is probably the meal plan, but the food at Tufts is awesome as far as dining hall food goes. The library is one of my favorite places on campus to do work. It could be a little bigger - it tends to get really crowded around midterms and finals - but it is a really wonderful place. We get crime reports from our campus police somewhat frequently, because the surrounding areas of Medford and Somerville aren't necessarily the safest, but I've always felt really safe on campus. We have an open campus, but I've walked back from the library at 3 a.m. by myself (I'm a female) and I've felt totally safe. Overall, I'm very happy living on campus and I'm sad that next year (my Junior year) I'm going to live off campus. I mean, I found a great group of people to live with but I am just going to miss being on campus.

Admissions

At this point, I think Tufts is pretty well-known for its unique option to include a YouTube video as part of your application. They also have quite a few essays - I think it's 3 or 4 - in addition to the common application essays, but they're pretty good questions and interesting to answer. My interview was pretty easy too.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2013

4.3 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Quality of Life

Housing is below average, dinning is good, but over priced.

Admissions

Common application with supplement. Early decision 2.

Level

2

Graduation Year

2014