Overall Student Rating
3.6 of 5 stars (8 Ratings)

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Displaying 1-8 of 8 Student Reviews

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They lied to my face.... pretty campus though

1.0 of 5 stars

September 2018 | CURRENT STUDENT

Uppers

Beautiful campus, very diverse and accepting, lots of things to do on and off campus, lots of opportunities for career and networking

Downers

Ridiculous on-campus housing situation. I applied in early September (a year in advance of when I needed to get housing) and was still 300+ on the waitlist for all six of my choices by the following August. They straight up lied to me about my chances of getting housing, saying I would definitely get a spot, plus also lied to me about my chances of getting into my major (I didn’t; the cutoff GPA was 10% higher than what they said it would be). Only one of my 9 instructors last year was actually a good instructor.

Comments

Be prepared to live off campus after your first year; you’d have an easier chance at winning the lottery than getting into upper year housing here.

Would You Recommend

No

4.3 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Academics at UBC are great. There are few general requirements so you are free to focus more on your major/minor or electives that genuinely interest you. The class sizes are reasonable, some are larger but when you become more specialized they become quite small. The first year Arts programs are an excellent way to break down class sizes. I participated in the Arts One program and had the opportunity to have class time with just four students and a professor. It is a fantastic small liberal arts program within a large university. With the Arts One program UBC is truly able to offer the best of both worlds for students who desire a degree within the social sciences.

There are also a wealth of other opportunities at UBC. we have excellent professors who are fascinating academics as well as excellent teachers. They truly care about their research and their students. Grading is tough but always fair; you know that you deserve the grade you received. The workload is heavy but it is still manageable as long as you stay organized.

Quality of Life

Life at UBC is great. The cost of living is a little high but that is to be expected in a big, affluent city like Vancouver. All things considered, prices on campus are quite reasonable. The campus has excellent facilities for everything from libraries, to classrooms, to social space.

The physical campus is beautiful. It consists of many beaches and gardens which are wonderful places to visit year round. The campus is also very safe nothing really bad has happened during my time here. The relations with the community are also great. UBC is in Vancouver but out on it's own peninsula so it's a great mix of having very easy access to the city without being a completely urban campus. Vancouver also has an excellent bus system and UBC provides a very cheap student bus pass so every part of the city is easy to reach.

Overall the quality of life at UBC is great and most people are very happy here.

Admissions

The admission process differs depending on if you are a domestic or international student. As an international student I submitted a transcript, ACT/SAT scores, and a supplemental application consisting mainly of essays and a list of my extracurriculars and awards. There are quite a few scholarship opportunities and I received an entrance award.

Level

4

Graduation Year

2012

4.3 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

The first year of the program entails taking general courses that aren't all that necessarily business courses, such as economics, english, math, and some other electives. Introductory accounting and organizational behaviour are required as well though. Second year is more geared towards learning about the managerial side of business, with managerial accounting and economics being offered. Students get a broader insight into the different facets of commerce such as marketing, finance, and human resources in their second year as well. Students are required to select their majors before entering third year, and the third year is composed of courses that are specific for your major. Fourth year is the same. Class sizes are very good in Sauder, partly because the number of students in the faculty is low relative to other faculties. Sauder has more resources available to students compared to other faculties as well, such as a career office that works very closely with the student body to improve students' level of employability and to create job opportunities for students as well. The workload is comparable to other faculties at UBC, although because the program is extremely selctive, the level of competition is high. Everyone is very intelligent, and scoring high on the bell curve is not easy. Faculty members are great for the most part, and most professors are very accessible and willing to help students, even when it comes to extra-curricular activities.

Quality of Life

Housing is not hard to come by, although the cost of living in Vancouver is high relative to other cities in the world. Looking at $600/month rent, and food would be an additional expense. Campus has plenty of facilities, free access to many things such as the aquatic center and museums, and the fitness facility is state of the art and is only $6/month. Very safe campus and programs in place to ensure student safety such as a Safe Walk program and Campus Security that is always on patrol.

Admissions

Students submit their marks online, and the university checks our marks with the province of BC. Sauder (the business school) requires students to submit a supplemental application, which includes questions about extracurricular involvement and other life experiences. I recall answering a question on the supplemental application regarding a time when I had faced an ethical dilemma, and how I responded/acted in that situation. There were two 500 word essays and a couple of short answer questions as well. I was waitlisted and didn't receive my acceptance until very late in July, which may have been due to the fact that I submitted my application very close to the deadline, or simply because my acceptance decision was borderline.

Level

4

Graduation Year

2012

4.0 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

My program as part of the land and food system faculty consists of core science prerequisites during the first two years. Due to the fact that I am in the general food nutrition and health program, my upper years don't have very specific requirements. Academic advising is very available and approachable, but a lot of personal research on courses is required because of how general my program is. Class sizes has gotten a bit smaller, but not drastically smaller for me. Professors are very accessible and approachable. They are a very big help and I regret not interacting with them more in my first year. Research opportunities I have not looked into very much. The grading seems fair. Taking four classes a term and working 10 hours a week with a 2 hour commute is busy, but very doable.

Quality of Life

In my second year I lived on campus, it was affordable with my student loan, and very convenient. The libraries are open late and there were ample places to study during finals. The roomates are great and classmates are all very friendly. In my third year of living off campus with an hour commute, it is a bit harder to be a large part of the communities on campus, but still very happy with the quality of life at UBC. Individuals at UBC are very open minded and accepting.

Admissions

Went online and researched and chose a first choice and second choice program. School counselor sent highschool transcripts, and from being a part of the IB program, received a scholarship.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2013

4.0 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

The majority of science courses at UBC comprise of a lecture and lab component. Evaluation is based mainly on your midterm grades and performance on the final exam. Sometimes, but not always, there may be additional assignments that are required to be handed in for credit.

In terms of general requirements, no matter what your specific specialization is, all students with a major in any form of life sciences take the same courses in first year, which includes General Chemistry, Biology, Physics, and single-variable calculus. Although your major is declared at the end of first year, a large proportion of the second-year courses for all life-science major students are very similar, thus, there is flexibility in switching majors after second year, as specialization does not occur until third year.

Quality of Life

One commendable aspect of UBC is that the university goes above and beyond in creating a sense of community amongst students. The university offers countless opportunities for students to be involved, ranging from the Greek system, to RezLife, to student politics, to clubs. It is guaranteed that almost everyone can find their "niche", finding opportunities that are related to their career goals and personal interests to create their own unique university experience.

With a total of 7 different residences, many upper-year level students are able to live on campus. However, it is unfortunate that there are many people who are in need of housing, but are not offered a spot due to the limited space as the university's land is used for building new market housing, which detracts the collegiate feel of the university.

Admissions

When I applied to UBC, I filled out a common application form for all the post-secondary institutions in BC via PASBC. Through PASBC, I also filled out the questions specific to just UBC. Admission was based primarily on my high school GPA and after I submitted my interim grades in March, I instantly received a message notifying me that I have been admitted. There were no essays required for admittance into UBC Faculty of Science. However, there was an optional supplemental portion, which I did not complete for my application.

Level

4

Graduation Year

2012

4.0 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

Academic advising is a fantastic service and is frequently used by students. Some pre-requisite classes are quite big, but 400-level seminars are intimate and enable thorough academic discussions. Degree requirements often request for certain science and art credits as well as fulfilling a certain amount of electivies in addition to your major core courses. Professors are amazingly accessible, as they provide office hours every week. Their help and guidance is highly valued by students, and it is always enforced to see your professors during their office hours. UBC is a great school and is quite competitive, not only in academics but all across the board, in sports, clubs, working positions, studying abroad, traditions and festivals, this makes UBC an energetic and enthusiastic campus. The grading schemes vary across faculties and.

Quality of Life

UBC facilities are fantastic, the 13 libraries on campus all have fantastic resources. Sports facilities are great, there are numerous work-out gyms, a new track and field, tennis courts, rugby fields, ice hockey rinks, Olympic swimming pool, basketball gyms, dance studios and Dojo studios etc. There are a lot of food services around campus, serving mostly cafe styled foods and there are the two first year dining halls too. The dining halls provide a variety of foods and accomodates all styles and diets. The neighborhood is beautiful, surrounded by forests and beaches and it is an overall very safe campus.

Admissions

The admissions process is straight forward and clear. As an international student there is an optional essay which I completed. There are a lot of different scholarship opportunities too, which is very beneficial and worth looking in to.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2011

3.7 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

In the business school, 1/8 of classes are specific to a major/specialization, 1/4 are non business electives, 1/2 are core business courses, and the last 1/8 are flexible electives. There are standard time tables for the first 2 years and you typically have choice over less than half of your classes for a specific year. I have had access to academic advising whenever I've needed it, there are a lot of drop in hours. Class sizes have varied from 25-400 but trend towards smaller classes in upper years. The school is very competitive and classes are generally graded difficultly although it varies widely across faculty and area. In my first 2 years I have not really felt that I've had a lot of opportunities to meet professors. Many opportunities to study abroad, I currently have friends studying on almost every continent. Workload is heavy but extremely manageable and not overly challenging.

Quality of Life

Housing for first year students is managed extremely well and was a very rewarding experience. Housing in later years becomes less available and is very expensive due to the nature of Vancouver real estate. Cost of living in general tends to be higher than those I have compared against but is not unreasonable. Campus is unbelievably beautiful, extremely friendly, and has great facilities. There are great dining options both on and off campus. There is a ton of library space but it still gets crowded during busy times. The surrounding neighborhoods to the University are fun, safe, and provide all the necessary services and more. The campus is extremely safe and I never feel at risk at night. Overall it is an extremely happy place despite the rain.

Admissions

Unique application. Entirely quantitative for the university as a whole. Supplementary application to get into the business school required listing and describing extracurricular activities and answering short essay questions.

Level

3

Graduation Year

2014

3.2 of 5 stars

2011 | VERIFIED STUDENT

Academics

In my faculty we had requirements to be filled at some point in our degree (science, language, English and literature credits). Also, in my major (Psychology) we had a variety of lists to pick certain types of courses (e.g. some courses were cognitively focused, some were socially focused, some were based on brain and behaviour) and we had to have a certain percentage of upper year courses. Academic Advising is addressed by advisors in each major as well as faculty-wide advisors. Both are excellent and were very very helpful during my degree (and also extremely accessible as they had drop-in hours daily). Class size was larger in first year but had smaller breakout groups and classes decreased in size as I got to the later years in my degree. Professors were very accessible through email and weekly office hours as well as before/after class and at other points in the week. In my major every course was scaled to a mean and standardized in terms of standard deviation and distribution. I did not study abroad but there are many opportunities to do so at my school (in fact I regret not taking part in them!)

Quality of Life

Vancouver is an expensive city to live in for anyone. That said, there are options for students to live on or off campus at fairly affordable rates. The facilities of UBC are quite good and constantly improving. Most of the major faculties have either brand new buildings or recently renovated interiors in their buildings. We have many libraries in various sizes and styles (e.g. silent study vs. interactive learning styles). There are great food options on campus; even the residence cafeterias have quite diverse and tasty options and beyond that we have many restaurants, fast food, and more options. The neighbourhood on campus is very safe and has lots of green space which is nice to enjoy. We have many safety precautions in case of emergency but I never had to utilize any of them and always felt safe and happy on campus.

Admissions

The process is now different than when I applied. When I applied admissions for my faculty were based solely off marks and there was no supplemental application of essays, resumes, etc. Now, on the other hand, my faculty looks at marks as well as other essays and information provided by students.

Graduation Year

2011