Sports Psychologists

In general, sports psychologists work with amateur and professional athletes to improve their mental and physical health, as well as athletic performances, by using goal setting, imagery, focus strategies, and relaxation techniques, among others. Sports psychologists also strive to help athletes to mentally prepare for competition. There are approximately 116,390 psychologists employed in the United States, although sports psychologists comprise only a small segment of this number.

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Quick Facts
Alternate Title(s) Clinical Sports Psychologists, Educational Sports Psychologists, Research Sports Psychologists
Duties Work with amateur and professional athletes to improve their mental and physical health, as well as their athletic performances
Salary Range $25,000 to $100,000+
Work Environment Primarily Indoors
Best Geographical Location(s) Nationwide; most opportunities available in major metropolitan areas
Minimum Education Level
  • Master's Degree
  • Doctorate
School Subjects
  • Biology
  • Health
  • Psychology
Experience At least a year or more of internship or supervised experience
Personality Traits
  • Helpful
  • Problem-Solving
  • Scientific
Skills
  • Coaching/Physical Training
  • Interpersonal
  • Scientific
Certification or Licensing Required
Special Requirements None
Employment Prospects Fair
Advancement Prospects Good
Outlook About as Fast as the Average
Career Ladder
  • Professor, Self-Employed, or Sports Psychologist for a Professional Team
  • Sports Psychologist for a College Team
  • Sports Psychologist for an Amateur Team

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