Forestry Technicians

Forestry technicians work as members of a forest management team under the direction of a professional forester. They collect data and information needed to make decisions about resources and resource depletion. They also help plan, supervise, and conduct the operations necessary to maintain and protect forest growth, including harvesting, replanting, and marketing of forest products. Forestry technicians understand the inventory methods and management skills required to produce wood fiber and forest products. They help manage forests and wildlife areas and control fires, insects, and disease. Forestry technicians may also survey land, measure the output of forest products, and operate logging and log-handling equipment. Approximately 31,720 forest and conservation technicians are employed in the United States.


Quick Facts
Duties Manage and harvest forests for logging companies; conduct research and protect forests from fire and disease for government agencies; help manage urban forests
Alternate Title(s) Survey Assistants, Biological Aides, Forest-Fire Control Technicians, Technical Research Assistants, Sawmill Buyers, Pulp Buyers, Lumber Inspectors, Lumber Graders, Timber Cruisers, Tree-Nursery Management Assistants, Wildlife Technicians
Salary Range Below $25,000 to $75,000
Employment Prospects Fair
Advancement Prospects Good
Work Environment Primarily Outdoors
Best Geographical Location(s) Opportunities are available throughout the country
Education and Training
  • High School Diploma
  • Associate's Degree
Related School Subjects
  • Earth Science
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
Experience Internship or part-time job with a lumber company or conservation organization
Skills
  • Math
  • Mechanical/Manual Dexterity
  • Scientific
Personality Traits
  • Hands On
  • Problem-Solving
  • Technical
Licensure/Certification Required
Special Requirements None
Career Ladder
  • Forester or Forestry Consultant
  • Forestry Technician
  • Intern