Ergonomists

Ergonomists help increase human productivity, comfort, safety, and health, and to decrease injury and illness by designing human-centered equipment, furniture, work methods, and techniques. They combine knowledge from various sciences and apply it to jobs, systems, products, and environments. Ergonomists are also known as human factors engineers and human factors specialists.

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Quick Facts
Alternate Title(s) Human Factors Engineers, Human Factors Specialists
Duties Help increase human productivity, comfort, safety, and health by designing human-centered equipment, furniture, work methods, and techniques
Salary Range $25,000 to $100,000+
Work Environment Primarily Indoors
Best Geographical Location(s) Nationwide; largest concentration of ergonomists is in Washington, D.C.
Minimum Education Level
  • Master's Degree
School Subjects
  • Biology
  • Health
  • Physics
Experience Internship or assistantship
Personality Traits
  • Creative
  • Helpful
  • Problem-Solving
Skills
  • Drawing/Design
  • Interpersonal
  • Research
Certification or Licensing Recommended
Special Requirements None
Employment Prospects Good
Advancement Prospects Good
Outlook Little Change or More Slowly than the Average
Career Ladder
  • Manager, or Consultant, or Professor
  • Experienced Ergonomist
  • Entry-Level Ergonomist