Biologists

Biologists, also known as life scientistsĀ and biological scientists, study the origin, development, anatomy, function, distribution, and other basic principles of living organisms. They are concerned with the nature of life itself in humans, microorganisms, plants, and animals, and with the relationship of each organism to its environment. Biologists perform research in many specialties that advance the fields of medicine, agriculture, and industry. Approximately 32,320 biological scientists (all other not specified by DOL), 20,670 microbiologists, and 18,970 zoologists and wildlife biologists are employed in the United States.

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Quick Facts
Alternate Title(s) Biological Scientists, Life Scientists
Duties Study the origin, development, anatomy, function, distribution, and other basic principles of living organisms
Salary Range $25,000 to $100,000+
Work Environment Indoors/Outdoors
Best Geographical Location(s) Opportunities available throughout the country but vary geographically by a biologist's specialty, such as coastal regions offering better prospects for marine biologists
Minimum Education Level
  • Bachelor's Degree
  • Master's Degree
School Subjects
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Earth Science
Experience Internship, volunteer position, or a part-time job
Personality Traits
  • Curious
  • Hands On
  • Scientific
Skills
  • Organizational
  • Research
  • Scientific
Certification or Licensing Required
Special Requirements None
Employment Prospects Good
Advancement Prospects Good
Outlook Little Change or More Slowly than the Average
Career Ladder
  • Professor or Project Chief
  • Biologist
  • Biological Technician