Audio Recording Engineers

Audio recording engineers oversee the technical end of recording. They operate the controls of the recording equipment—often under the direction of a music producer—during the production of music recordings; film, television, and radio productions; and other mediums that require sound recording. Recording engineers monitor and operate electronic and computer consoles to make necessary adjustments, and solve technical problems as they occur during a recording session. They assure that the equipment is in optimal working order and obtain any additional equipment necessary for the recording. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, there are approximately 121,400 broadcast and sound engineering technicians employed in the United States.

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Quick Facts
Alternate Title(s) Recording Engineers
Duties Monitor and operate electronic and computer consoles to make necessary adjustments, and solve technical problems as they occur during a recording session
Salary Range Below $25,000 to $100,000
Work Environment Primarily Indoors
Best Geographical Location(s) Opportunities are available throughout the country, but most major recording studios are located in big cities such as New York and Los Angeles
Minimum Education Level
  • Some Postsecondary Training
  • Associate's Degree
School Subjects
  • Computer Science
  • Music
  • Technical/Shop
Experience Internships, part-time jobs
Personality Traits
  • Creative
  • Hands On
  • Technical
Skills
  • Computer
  • Mechanical/Manual Dexterity
  • Performance
  • Music
  • and Acting
Certification or Licensing Recommended
Special Requirements None
Employment Prospects Fair
Advancement Prospects Good
Outlook Little Change or More Slowly than the Average
Career Ladder
  • Music Producer
  • Audio Recording Engineer
  • Studio Technician

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