Archivists

Archivists contribute to the study of the arts and sciences by analyzing, acquiring, and preserving historical documents, artwork, organizational and personal records, and information systems that are significant enough to be preserved for future generations. Archivists keep track of artifacts such as letters, contracts, films, photographs, video and sound recordings, digital files, blueprints, and other items of potential historical significance. Approximately 5,560 archivists are employed in the United States.


Quick Facts
Duties Analyze, acquire, and preserve historical documents, artwork, organizational and personal records, and information systems
Alternate Title(s) None
Salary Range $25,000 to $100,000
Employment Prospects Good
Advancement Prospects Fair
Work Environment Primarily Indoors
Best Geographical Location(s) Opportunities are available throughout the country, but are best in large, metropolitan areas
Education and Training
  • Master's Degree
Related School Subjects
  • Art History
  • Foreign Language
  • History
Experience Working in an archive during college will provide useful experience; some jobs require 3-5 years of professional experience
Skills
  • Business Management
  • Information Management
  • Organizational
Personality Traits
  • Conventional
  • Organized
  • Realistic
Licensure/Certification Recommended
Special Requirements None
Career Ladder
  • Head Archivist, Curator, Chief Librarian
  • Archivist
  • Archival Assistant

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