Arborists

Employment of tree trimmers and pruners is expected to grow by 6 percent, about as fast as the average for all careers, through 2024, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The public's increasing interest in the planning and the preservation of the environment has maintained demand for qualified arborists. Towns across the country are planting large numbers of trees to improve the environment, and arborists will be in demand to care for them. Many homeowners are willing to pay top dollar for professionally designed and maintained landscaping. Increased resistance to pesticides and new species of insects pose constant threats to all trees. While travel abroad is easier and, in a sense, has made our world smaller, it has also placed our environment at risk. For example, Asian longhorned beetles were unknowingly transported to the United States via packing material. By the time the insects were discovered, the beetles had irreversibly damaged thousands of mature trees throughout New York, Chicago, and surrounding areas. Arborists, especially those trained to diagnose and treat such cases, will be in demand to work in urban areas.  


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