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Derek Loosvelt

Derek Loosvelt is Vault's senior finance editor. Derek has a BS in economics from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and an MFA in creative writing from the New School. His writing has appeared in several online and print publications. Previously, he worked in investment banking as an M&A analyst and associate.


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All Posts by Derek Loosvelt

‘Flash Boys’ Author Michael Lewis: IT Geeks Shall Inherit the Street

by Derek Loosvelt  |  April 04, 2014

For a long time, Wall Street knew this day was coming. And now, Michael Lewis and Main Street know it, too. In the very near future, no longer will the sharpest blue-blooded, type A, squash-playing, financially-driven Ivy League graduate with excellent complexion rule the trading desks of Wall Street's largest and most-storied institutions. Instead, it will be the most creative and innovative IT guy (or gal) who'll be calling all the shots. And here's Michael Lewis, speaking on Bloomberg... Read More >

Are Employees With Autism Better Employees?

by Derek Loosvelt  |  March 28, 2014

In the trailer for the new HBO series "Silicon Valley," which premiers Sunday April 6th, one of the superstar programmers at the center of the show is mumbling his way through a description of his tech venture when he's mistakenly called out as someone with Asperger's. Although the scene plays for laughs, it perhaps underscores the very unfunny fact that today more than 3 million Americans suffer from some form of autism. And, according to a recent study pointed out by the Wall Street... Read More >

Heir to Dimon's JPMorgan Throne Calls It Quits

by Derek Loosvelt  |  March 26, 2014

The so-called brain drain continues at beleaguered JPMorgan Chase. A few days ago, a man named Fang Fang, the chief of JPMorgan's Chinese investment banking unit, quit amid an investigation into the bank's alleged practices of hiring people in Asia so their relatives in the government would send business the bank's way. And yesterday, Michael Cavanagh, co-head of JPMorgan's global investment banking operations, announced that he was jumping ship to the Carlyle Group, a Washington,... Read More >

Should Women Ask For Pay Raises Differently From Men?

by Derek Loosvelt  |  March 25, 2014

According to this New York Times video, the answer is yes. In fact, the Times believes that "when women advocate for themselves at work it can sometimes backfire, which is why women need to take a more measured approach when asking for a raise or anything else at work." Although I'm not so sure that women need to take a different strategy from men in this regard (should men simply skip into their boss's office and call out, "How does a 10 percent hike work for you?"), the Times makes a... Read More >

CEO Tweets of the Week: Gross, Musk, Holmes, and Weiner

by Derek Loosvelt  |  March 21, 2014

Unfortunately I couldn't find any CEO tweets about Mercer University's upset of Duke University in the first round of the NCAA Men's College Basketball Tournament. However, I did find one shining moment involving a Stanford physicist, as well as a rather professional-looking commercial from two amateur filmmakers who recently graduated from the University of Southern California (the Trojan women face St. John's in the first round of the NCAA Women's tournament on Saturday), and both the... Read More >

To Big 4 and Mid-Size Firm Accountants, Which is More Important: Prestige or Culture?

by Derek Loosvelt  |  March 19, 2014

On Tax Day, which is just under four weeks away, Vault will be releasing its latest Accounting Rankings, which include rankings of the most prestigious accounting firms, those deemed the "best to work for," and the top rated firms in compensation, benefits, training, work/life balance, and firm culture, among other workplace categories.  This year, we surveyed more than 10,000 accountants at the top 90 accounting firms in the U.S., asking them to comment on life at their firm. Included in... Read More >

Q&A With Marcus Lemonis, Star of CNBC’s ‘The Profit’

by Derek Loosvelt  |  March 05, 2014

At the age of 12, Marcus Lemonis, star of CNBC's "The Profit," owned a lawn cutting business that made $1,000 a week. At 22, without any prior political experience (other than a summer internship on Capitol Hill), Lemonis ran for a state seat in Florida and nearly beat a three-term incumbent. Not long afterward, Lemonis joined AutoNation, the largest car retailer in the country, and quickly rose the corporate ladder. Then came a pivotal meeting with one of the most famous car men in... Read More >

CEO Tweets of the Week: Gates, Branson, Levie, and Case

by Derek Loosvelt  |  February 21, 2014

"If you're not failing every now and again, it's a sign you're not doing anything very innovative." "Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up." "Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better." These quotes of failure (from Woody Allen, Thomas Edison, and Samuel Beckett, respectively) have been popularized for a reason. And that reason is failure is the route to success. That said, failing stinks. And... Read More >

CEO Tweets of the Week: Stewart, Krawcheck, Mahindra, and Cook

by Derek Loosvelt  |  February 14, 2014

This past week several men and women put in performances of their careers @Sochi2014. Americans Sage Kostenburg and Jamie Anderson put in fine final runs to take gold in men's and women's snowboard slopestyle, respectively. The Japanese nineteen-year-old Yuzura Hanyu skated a world-record short program on his way to take gold in men's singles. The speedskating men and women of the Netherlands dominated the ice, picking up all kinds of golds, silvers, and bronzes. And a previously unknown... Read More >

What We Talk About When We Talk About AOL’s Distressed Babies

by Derek Loosvelt  |  February 12, 2014

Before I address AOL CEO Tim Armstrong's public justification for scaling back his firm's 401(k) plan on rising health care costs such as those associated with "two AOL-ers that had distressed babies that were born that we paid a million dollars each to make sure were O.K.," I'd like to make a few observations gleaned from my two decades as part of the so-called American workforce. The first: people are typically paid commensurate with the amount of stress their job requires; that is, on... Read More >

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