IBM Global Technology Services

A limb of the Big Blue tree

IBM Global Technology Services (GTS) is the IT infrastructure and business process services segment of IBM, one of the largest IT and software companies in the world.  It offers strategic outsourcing, business transformation outsourcing, integrated technology services, and maintenance and support, while the industries it targets include aerospace and defense, automotive, banking, chemicals, consumer products, education, electronics, energy and utilities, financial markets, government, health care, insurance, retail, telecommunications and others.  Clients come in all shapes and sizes, the firm's solutions are available at any scale, from small business to multinational enterprise.

IBM itself has been around since the 19th century, when it was making the earliest possible versions of computers, clockwork machines that computed, tabulated and recorded times and figures.  The history of GTS is considerably shorter, having solidified as a major force in the industry in 1990s after IBM acquired PricewaterhouseCoopers Consulting, doubling its consulting staff and allowing the company to shift its focus away from manufacturing and commodities toward services.  As the wheel of the business rotated and pushed services at the top, the next logical step was to make the head of global services, Sam Palmisano, the head of the whole firm.  He was named CEO in 2002, and subsequently elected chairman of the board.  Not long after, in 2005, IBM divested its PC business and the swing toward services was complete.  Also at that time, Mike Daniels was put in charge of global technology services as senior vice president.

Setting a course

In 2007, GTS introduced a line of assessment tools, agility indicators, business process management software and content that could be custom made sector by sector, measuring different metrics for retail, for example, than it would for health care.  Moreover, reflecting the modern market and customer base, the firm introduced technologies and services for businesses seeking out informed, self-sufficient consumers, such as a self-service kiosk with wireless functionality and point-of-sale options and redesigned customer relationship tools.

Sound advice

GTS' IT strategy and architecture service practice, one of its primary consulting offerings, encompasses technology management consulting, transformation and optimization advisory, and SOA infrastructure consulting services. Engagements can address cost reduction, operational efficiency, carbon footprint reduction, improved time to market and customer satisfaction. In a "success story" published in February 2009, the firm reported that it had recently completed an engagement with Sisters of Mercy Health System, an organization with 27 medical facilities (18 acute care hospitals, two heart hospitals and seven "other medical facilities") and some 33,500 employees.  In a bid to improve its medical record keeping, Sisters of Mercy had recently purchased a new information system to manage its records, but required assistance with training and implementation of the system across its facilities and workforce.  Accordingly, IBM provided templates that standardized much of the roll-out and training across all facilities.  Additionally, the GTS team deployed a number of existing IBM applications to support the record-keeping system going forward.

Let's make a deal

IBM frequently seeks out acquisitions that will give it an advantage through new software and service capabilities or a foothold in an emerging geographic market.  In October 2008, it announced an agreement to purchase ILOG, a France-based provider of business process management solutions.  The added technology will enhance IBM's current portfolio of rule management tools.  In July that year, it picked up Platform Solutions, a maker of a dynamic mainframe that allows simultaneous use of multiple operating systems.  Though Platform is a small company, the acquisition has the added benefit of making the patent infringement suit (IBM accusing Platform) and antitrust violation countersuit (Platform accusing IBM) between the two companies disappear.  And in April 2008, the firm bought InfoDyne Corp. of Illinois, a maker of high-speed platforms and data feed connectors.  The deal was an attractive one, as InfoDyne would boost the capability of IBM's WebSphere technology, giving financial services clients faster access to market data.



IBM Global Technology Services


New Orchard Road
Armonk, NY 10504
Phone: (914) 499-1900
Fax: (914) 765-7382
www.ibm.com/technologyservices

STATS


  • Employer Type: Public
  • Stock Symbol: IBM
  • Stock Exchange: NYSE
  • Senior Vice President: Erich Clementi
  • 2010 Employees: 400,000

Major Office Locations

  • Armonk, NY

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