Posts Tagged: Workplace Issues

Dear Class of 2013

Dear Class of 2013, I know what you're thinking. 'Why didn't I just drop out of high school, create a simple blog service, then sell the darn thing to a company down on its luck for a you-know-what's-cool one billion dollars?'  No, seriously. College is much more than a path to gainful unemployment. It's about connecting with your peers. Read More >

Can Good Lawyers Be Good Parents?

Are rainmaking and homemaking compatible endeavors or unlikely bedfellows? Read More >

Is the Future of Professional Education Here?

It's felt for a while like we're on the verge of a major step forward in how education is designed and delivered to students-and it seems like the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) may well be the future we've been waiting for. Read More >

27 Interview Questions That Weed Out the Weak on Wall Street

If you're preparing to interview for a position in investment banking, sales and trading, or investment management, it's likely you've already practiced answering a host of interview questions, including: What are your strengths and weaknesses? Why do you want to work for this firm in particular? How do you value a company? Can you walk me through a DCF? Can you pitch me a stock I should buy? Can you tell me about a time when you worked on a team? Why are you interested in finance? Read More >

How to Win: Career Lessons from Soccer's Greatest Manager

It's a mark of how much times and interests have changed that news of the retirement of Sir Alex Ferguson from the manager's job at Manchester United made it into mainstream U.S. media last week. At the start of his managerial career, Ferguson leaving a job would barely have created a stir in the neighboring town in his native Scotland, while the American audience for his version of "football" barely registered on the scale. Read More >

Vault's Working Parent Survey: Do Women Even Want It All?

Can women have it all? Do women want it all? What do women have to sacrifice to have it all? If women could do it all over again, would they stay at home after having children? Stay at their jobs? Work less? More? Are working mothers happy with their employers? Ticked off at them? If so, why? And what can and should employers do differently to accommodate working mothers? Read More >

LinkedIn: The King of Social Recruiting

LinkedIn recently turned 10 years old. And the Mountain View, Calif.-based social network has much to celebrate. Founded in 2003, LinkedIn now has 225 million users worldwide, and its share price has nearly doubled since the firm's 2011 IPO. Meanwhile, other highly anticipated social media IPOs have fared rather poorly. Facebook's shares have fallen 40 percent since going public last year, and Zynga's shares have fallen nearly 70 percent since going public at the end of 2011. Read More >

Stop Multitasking, Start Working

A few years back, one of the resume buzz phrases du jour involved describing yourself with some variation of the following: "good/great/strong/effective multitasker." It had all the hallmarks of a great catchphrase-it sounded fresh and exciting, it conveyed a sense of its user as someone with their finger on the pulse, it had very few negative connotations, and it seemed to cover a lot of ground without actually saying anything at all. Read More >

Star Jones: "Simple Seven" Tips for Success

What do you think is holding your career back? That's the question Star Jones, spokeswoman for National Association of Professional Women, asks her audience at the organization's "Spark: Ignite Your Network" National Networking Conference. "Tell the person next to you," she says, and then, moments later, instructs everyone to also whisper it into their hands. With that, she has everyone "throw it." "When you pay attention to something, that's the direction you're going," she says. Read More >

Dimon, Blankfein, or Gorman: Which CEO Sounds Most Like a CEO?

Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal cited a new study showing that the way you talk-your pitch, tone, and vocal tics-strongly influences how others see you. For example, if you have a quiet voice, you're seen as weak; if your tone is high-pitched, immature; and if you um, like, uh stumble over words, not so smart. Read More >

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