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Category: Workplace Issues

To Big 4 and Mid-Size Firm Accountants, Which is More Important: Prestige or Culture?

On Tax Day, which is just under four weeks away, Vault will be releasing its latest Accounting Rankings, which include rankings of the most prestigious accounting firms, those deemed the "best to work for," and the top rated firms in compensation, benefits, training, work/life balance, and firm culture, among other workplace categories.  This year, we surveyed more than 10,000 accountants at the top 90 accounting firms in the U.S., asking them to comment on life at their firm. Read More >

5 Jobs on ‘House of Cards’ That Look Cooler and More Exciting Than They Probably Are

Let me warn you: if you haven't watched the first two seasons of the highly entertaining, highly addictive, highly thrilling Netflix-produced "House of Cards" but plan to, there are going to be some massive PLOT SPOILERS in the words to follow. Read More >

Bad Jobs: What I've Learned from the Worst Jobs I've Held

As a follow-up to my recent post on the lessons I learned from the best jobs I've had, I've been thinking about some of the worst-or least enjoyable-positions that I've held in my two-plus decades in the workforce. Read More >

How Can Female Attorneys Avoid Being an Underpaid Non-Partner Track Associate?

Earlier this month,  the National Association of Women Lawyers released its "Report of the Eight Annual NAWL National Survey on Retention and Promotion of Women in Law Firms," a survey of 200 of the largest law firms in the United States for 2013, that mirrored the findings in Vault's 2013 Law Firm Associate Survey. Read More >

Great Jobs: What I've Learned from the Best Jobs I've Held

I realized this year that, having found my first job while still in high school, I have now been in the workforce for more than two decades-and fortunate enough to have been able to find and hold employment for most of that period. Since those first forays into the world of work, I have held-as anyone who has looked at my profile page here at Vault will know-a variety of jobs in different industries, across three continents. Read More >

Q&A With Marcus Lemonis, Star of CNBC’s ‘The Profit’

At the age of 12, Marcus Lemonis, star of CNBC's "The Profit," owned a lawn cutting business that made $1,000 a week. At 22, without any prior political experience (other than a summer internship on Capitol Hill), Lemonis ran for a state seat in Florida and nearly beat a three-term incumbent. Not long afterward, Lemonis joined AutoNation, the largest car retailer in the country, and quickly rose the corporate ladder. Read More >

What’s Really Happening with Ladies in the Law? Observations from NAWL and Vault Surveys

Well, lady lawyers, the results are in. You will likely be disappointed, but probably not overly surprised, to learn that you're still getting paid less than your male counterparts and working in the lowest-status attorney positions in the firm. The National Association of Women Lawyers recently released its "Report of the Eight Annual NAWL National Survey on Retention and Promotion of Women in Law Firms," surveying 200 of the largest law firms in the United States for 2013. Read More >

Career Capital: How Can Employees Get Ahead?

Just in time for International Women's day, Accenture has released the results of a study into factors affecting success in the workplace. Read More >

CEO Tweets of the Week: Gates, Branson, Levie, and Case

"If you're not failing every now and again, it's a sign you're not doing anything very innovative." "Many of life's failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up." "Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better." These quotes of failure (from Woody Allen, Thomas Edison, and Samuel Beckett, respectively) have been popularized for a reason. And that reason is failure is the route to success. That said, failing stinks. Read More >

Celebrating Black History Month in the Workplace: The Power of One

In 1915, historian Carter G. Woodson and the Reverend Jesse E. Moorland founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History. Nine years later, Woodson and Moorland led a successful petition calling for the second week in February to be devoted to celebrating the heritage and achievements of African Americans. In the 1960s, that weeklong celebration became a month-long one, and in 1976, President Gerald Ford officially recognized February as Black History Month. Read More >

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