Posts Tagged: Workplace Issues

The Revolution Against Open-Office Plans Has Begun

Although 70 percent of the American workforce now works shoulder-to-shoulder in football-field sized rooms without anything as much as an iPhone-thin wall separating their desks, studies continue to show that open-office plans are detrimental to employees' concentration, productivity, creativity, stress level, and job satisfaction, not to mention their health. Read More >

The Werewolf of Wall Street

The greed is unimaginable. The hubris is pornographic. And the smug, arrogant mask on the main character's face will make you clench your fists and grit your teeth with rage. No, I'm not talking about the latest Scorcese-DiCaprio collaboration but the latest PBS Frontline documentary, "To Catch a Trader," which follows the U.S. government's insider trading investigation of self-proclaimed Hedge Fund King Steven A. Cohen and his eponymous billion-dollar hedge fund empire. Read More >

Best and Worst of 2013: The Year in Work and the Workplace

When it comes to career-related news and developments, there was a lot to celebrate in 2013. There was also a lot to condemn. And below, in no particular order, is a collection of bests and worsts from the year in work and the workplace. Best Use of a Beastie Boys Song to Attempt to Increase the Number of Engineers Who Are GirlsToy company GoldieBlox thought it had hit gold when its ad using the Beastie Boys' song "Girls" received more than 8 million views. Read More >

Better Interview Skills? There's an App for That!

The future is officially here: the year is 2013, and computers can now teach you how to be a warm, engaging human. Us+, a new art project-slash-app, seeks to take the bugs out of IRL communication. Emotionally tone-deaf? Whiny and rambling? Passive aggressive? Us+ knows all your issues, and, unlike your best friend or your interviewer, isn't afraid to tell you. Read More >

Our 13 Most Popular Blog Posts of 2013

During the past year, our readers wanted to know which firms topped our annual rankings of law, banking, accounting, and consulting firms. They wanted to know how to write letters of recommendation for themselves and how not to write follow-up letters to employers. They also wanted to know why women aren't doing a better job of networking, and if an M.B.A. is still worth their dime and a damn. And perhaps above all else, they wanted some simple tips on how to succeed on the job. Read More >

From Intern to CEO: Mary Barra Named GM’s First Female Chief

I grew up in the 1980s a few miles north of Detroit, and during that time in the area it seemed like every third classmate of mine came from a household whose father worked for one of the Big Three automakers-GM, Ford, or Chrysler. I also remember quite a few fathers working for auto part manufacturers. However, I don't recall any of my classmates' mothers working in the automotive industry. In fact, few of my classmates' mothers worked full-time jobs at all. In 1980 I was eight years old. Read More >

Why the 'Skills Gap' is Employers' Own Fault

A recent report from the Society of Human Resources Management (SHRM) highlights one of the biggest problems that companies have today: the ability to find employees who are ready to tackle the challenges they're likely to meet on the job. In pointing this out, however, the report also makes an unconscious point: that the problem is almost completely companies' own fault. Read More >

How to Avoid #AskJPM and Other PR Nightmares

A few weeks ago, JPMorgan's supposedly harmless Twitter exercise #AskJPM-in which the bank invited Twitter users to pose career-related questions to JPMorgan Vice Chairman James B. Lee Jr.-quickly backfired, and instead of asking Lee Jr. questions, the Twittersphere took the opportunity to tell JPMorgan and its management team what they really thought of them. Tweets like the following were posted (with the #AskJPM hashtag) by the hundreds: "What's your favorite type of whale? Read More >

Can Graduating in a Recession Be a Good Thing?

Give a bunch of academics long enough, and they'll come up with a study that can suggest just about anything-including an upside to this terrible job market. According to an article in The Week, researchers at Emory University's Goizueta Business School have found that there may be a correlation between job satisfaction over the course of a career and the economic climate that you graduated into. Read More >

Adjusted Expectations: 5 Women on Big Law, 12 Years Later

Five women, all embarking on law careers at Debevoise & Plimpton, reflected on "ambition, leadership and success" for the September 9th, 2001 issue of the New York Times. Unsurprisingly, they sounded confident, modern, full of energy, and boundlessly optimistic about their career possibilities as women in a male dominated field-especially at the high levels they aspired to. That was 12 years ago. Has big law changed? Read More >

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