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The Consulting Firm World Cup: Which Country Is Your Firm?

If your employer was a team at the World Cup, which one would they be? Those of us who follow the beautiful game closely know that the difference in style between the favorites for the tournament are as pronounced as the cultures of top firms the world over. Read More >

The Week on Wall Street: Ex-Goldman Banker Helps Apple Pick Up Beats

A former Goldman Sachs banker helps bring Beats to Apple.Behind every big M&A deal is a big M&A Wall Street banker. And Apple's acquisition of Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine's Beats Electronics is no exception. Adrian Perica-who joined Apple in 2009 and who is an alumnus of West Point, MIT, Deloitte, and Goldman Sachs-is the former Wall Street banker who helped put Apple and Beats together. Read More >

Too Confident to Fail

With the proliferation of the virtual marketplace and crowdfunding sources, it's not surprising to learn that today it's easier than ever to start a business and get it funded. It's also not surprising that since there are more new businesses than ever, there are more failed businesses than ever, too. But what is surprising (at least to me) is that studies show that failure doesn't equal learning experience in the startup world. Read More >

Which State Has the Most Working Moms?

According to a new study released by Ancestry.com, it's South Dakota, where 79.9 percent of mothers work outside the home according to the latest Census figures. And it's been that way for the past 30 years. But in 1930 South Dakota had the lowest number of working moms per capita. What accounts for the change? Today, South Dakota actually has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the U.S. According to an Ancestry. Read More >

History of the Male-Female Salary Gap: A 95-Year-Old Problem

Last year, the Equal Pay Act signed by John F. Kennedy turned 50 years old. The Act was designed to create a society where women were as valued as men in the workforce and to remove barriers that caused discrimination. Because of that Act, when discussing equality in the workplace, 1963 is widely considered the beginning of establishing a fair playing field for women in the workforce. However, the problem was not a new one in the early '60s. Read More >

Face It, We’re Cubed

There's a very good chance that right now you're seated in a swiveling, ergonomic chair on wheels, staring at a computer screen, reading these digital words within three or four flimsy chest-high walls, just beyond which is another person who's seated in a swiveling, ergonomic chair on wheels, staring at a computer screen, reading other digital words within three or four flimsy chest-high walls, just beyond which is another person … and so on, and so on, and so on. Read More >

Pope Francis' First Year: The Next Great Harvard Business School Case Study?

If the Roman Catholic Church were a public company, its share price would have doubled in the past year and its CEO would now be in a strong position to ask the board for a raise. This is more or less what The Economist implied last week when it published an article called "The Francis Effect," comparing the Pope to great turnaround CEOs "such as IBM's Lou Gerstner, Fiat's Sergio Marchionne, and Apple's Steve Jobs. Read More >

Deutsche Bank's $4 Billion Hangover, Part 2

Three years ago, just after the Deutsche Bank-owned Cosmopolitan hotel and casino opened in Las Vegas, I spoke with a Vegas insider about the German bank's big Sin City bet (you can read part of that conversation in a previous post here). Read More >

Why Attractive People Make Bad Bosses

Okay, so that headline might be a little over the top, but it's definitely implied in the findings of a recent series of research papers by Stanford Graduate Business School professor Margaret Neale and doctoral student Peter Belmi. The pair's research examined how individual mindsets can be affected by perceptions of their own attractiveness. Read More >

Does this Study Prove that Law Firm Partners are Racist?

So it turns out that partners at law firms are racist, and they don't even know it. The legal industry, particularly, BigLaw, has long struggled with diversity. While improvements have been made in the hiring of diverse associates, many law firms still fail to retain and promote minority and female associates. Read More >

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