Posts Tagged: Resumes & Cover Letters

Home for the Holidays? 4 Ways NOT Working Can Boost Your Career

Dreading the idleness of the holidays? Fear not. A little time away from your desk and even-gasp-your wireless access can be good for career and even your job search. Here's how to enjoy the time off to its fullest--while making professional advances that will pay off by Christmas. A few "gifts" of the holiday season to be thankful for: 1. Long Plane, Train, or Automobile Rides Got a long trip and a lap top? You're golden! Don't bother "working from home" if you can. Read More >

Getting a Law Job with Average Grades...and other Questions

Have questions about how to navigate the world of legal networking, interviewing and job searching? So did more than 1200 law students, who tuned in to the lively and informative webcast "Ask the Experts-Answers to Your Questions on Legal Job Search, Networking and Interviewing" on Thursday, November 8. Read More >

4 Reasons You Should (Still!) Take an Internship

Internships have been in the spotlight a lot lately, but for all the wrong reasons: unhappy interns. It's not a new story-interns have long gone unpaid, unthanked, and sent on one too many coffee runs. But a recent slew of class action suits raises the question: where does opportunity end and exploitation begin? Though it's up to the courts to decide what's fair labor in the realm of interning, you should know that not all unpaid gigs are equal. Read More >

How My Liberal Arts Degree Paved the Way for a Consulting Career

As recruiting season kicks off, I remember back to two years ago when I was just beginning the interview process as a Dartmouth senior. Studying for a degree in History and Geography, I had enjoyed my liberal arts coursework, but was interested in pursuing a consulting career post-graduation. I wanted to quickly gain a variety of business skills and get broad exposure to several different industries rather than committing to one before knowing what I was actually passionate about. Read More >

The "Detial Oriented" Need Not Apply

All applicants say they're detail-oriented; I just make my employees prove it," says Kyle Wiens. As the CEO of a software company who hires "code monkeys" (programmers), it makes sense that he'd need conscientious workers. But Wiens has an unusual way of making sure new hires are competent: he gives them a grammar test. Seem unrelated to coding work? Wiens doesn't think so. He explains this practice in Harvard Business Review: "I hire people who care about those details. Read More >

Tighten Up: 6 Tips to Leaner, Meaner Resume

In today's social media age, you'd be better off taking resume cues from your Linked In page than your parents. Electronic submission and a tough economy means lots of resumes for HR people to sort through, and very little time and attention to devote to them. Your best bet for getting noticed? Getting to the point! A former human resources intern  and current Gen-Yer Sara Coppola offers advice on grabbing her attention: 1. Focus Trim the "experience" fat. Read More >

Risky Business: 3 Interview Gambles That Pay Off

The Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) posed a question to its members: "What types of things should job seekers include in their resumes if they're trying to get hired by a successful startup?" The invite-only nonprofit (made up of young entrepreneurs) got a lot of great answers from small business owners on what they'd like to see-but what about a big company? How can you be bold enough to be noticed without being offensive? Read More >

What It Takes to Join a Top Wall Street Bank

With the application process for full-time and summer investment banking internships now underway, you might be asking yourself: What makes a successful candidate? To join any line of business at a top Wall Street firm, it's perhaps most important to demonstrate a deep interest in the financial industry, personal drive, and the ability to learn quickly. It's also important to demonstrate your capability to be entrepreneurial and motivated. Read More >

Showing Communication Skills: The Proof is in the Details

--By Marnie Consky All MBA-level jobs require you to have strong communication skills. Aside from singing your praises in your resume and cover letter, it's even more important to demonstrate those communication skills in instances where recruiters and hiring managers are paying attention. Outside of the obvious networking sessions and interviews, here are some situations where small details count: Voice mail: ensure that your voice mail message sounds professional. Read More >

How to Write Your Own Recommendation Letter

So you've developed a great relationship with your professor, mentor or supervisor, and it's time to ask for a letter of recommendation. While the standard practice is for references to write their own recommendation letters, it's becoming increasingly common for time-strapped individuals to ask you to pen the first draft of a letter yourself. Read More >

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