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Category: Finance

6 Finance Interview Questions That Test Your Market Knowledge

In light of the credit crunch of late 2008, students are going to see the same "How did we get here?" question masked in a variety of forms. A solid understanding of subprime and other credit-related products, write-downs, and leverage is key to answering these kinds of questions. Below are some examples of questions you might expect. All of these are designed to test your knowledge rather than assess your past behavior. 1. What is meant by mark-to-market? Read More >

Is the Constant Connection to Our Jobs Melting Our Children’s Minds?

Here's a scene you can witness at any number of New York City restaurants any night of the week: A mother sits down with her two young kids, and before menus are brought out, the mother hands the kids matching iPads. The kids then proceed to play video games through their entire meal, looking up just once or twice from their respective screens, only to drink some water or fill their mouths with food they're too busy to taste. Read More >

Pros and Cons of the Uberization of Work

Today, nearly one in five jobs is performed by a part-time independent contractor or freelancer. That's a 60 percent rise versus the number of jobs that part-timers held 15 years ago. This change in how we work has sometimes been referred to as the "gig economy." And recently, it has also been referred to as the "Uberization" of the workplace, named after the ride sharing company Uber, which employs 4,000 full-timers and 156,000 part-timers-that is, only 2. Read More >

5 Guesstimates Wall Street Firms Ask and How to Answer Them

Guesstimates are interview questions that involve asking candidates to come up with a figure, usually the size of a market or the number of objects in a certain area. Although guesstimates are more commonly given in interviews for consulting positions, they do pop up in finance interviews as well. Read More >

Debating the Affordability of an Undergraduate Degree

With the cost of college and thus student loan debt rising to ridiculous levels, there are many who believe an undergraduate degree is no longer worth pursuing. And that includes the very wealthy and very well educated. Take Peter Thiel, for example. Thiel is a big swinging PE investor and hedge fund manager who has two degrees from Stanford, co-founded PayPal, was Facebook's first external investor, and, at latest count, is worth well over $1.5 billion. Read More >

Are Cruel CEOs Better Leaders?

It's been well documented that many of today's great film directors are considered to be, to put it nicely, "difficult to work with." As evidence, there's the widely watched clip of David O. Read More >

3 Leadership Lessons From Obama's Talk With Marc Maron

Although a lot of web, print, and air space has been devoted to a certain word beginning with the letter N that President Obama used while a guest on Marc Maron's WTF podcast last Friday, there was so much more in the interview worth highlighting and remembering. Read More >

Goldman's New No Work After Midnight Policy

Years ago, back when I worked as a freelancer, there was this bar in Lower Manhattan that I frequented due to its notoriously good Sunday night happy hour, which actually began on Monday morning, that is, it began at the stroke of midnight-at 12 a.m. As I recall, this bar would be nearly empty on Sundays until about 11:56 p.m., at which point the place would begin to fill up and, by 12:03 a.m., there wouldn't be an open seat in sight. Read More >

Why More Women Aren't CEOs

On July 1, KPMG's Lynne Doughtie will become the first woman to hold both the CEO and chairwoman positions at a Big 4 firm. Doughtie will join Cathy Engelbert, Deloitte's CEO, in the Big 4 C-Suite. And so, come July, half of the Big 4 will be run by women. To be sure, this is a sign of great progress with respect to gender equality in the workplace. Unfortunately, it is also a reminder of just how few women still hold senior roles in U.S. firms. Read More >

Tricked-Out Cadillacs Are the New Corner Office

You've probably heard about (if not ridden in one of) those vans equipped with Wi-Fi and other amenities that cart the average tech worker at Facebook and other companies to their respective jobs in Silicon Valley. But what about the big swinging managers at the top of those firms? What do they take to get to their corner offices in traffic-congested places like the Bay Area? As it turns out, more and more of them are getting in tricked-out Cadillacs created by L.A. Read More >

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