Nepali Goddess Wants To Be A Banker

by Derek Loosvelt | April 08, 2010

Chanira Bajracharya, a 15-year-old whose resume includes blessing devotees, riding atop chariots and being an incarnation of the Hindu goddess Kali, says when she grows up she wants to work in finance, explaining in a recent interview with Reuters that she'd like to "study commerce or accounting and be engaged in the banking sector."

Nepali goddess

The goddess, who has not been allowed to "mingle with outsiders" and thus does not have any friends or playmates (though she does have two brothers), also told Reuters that if she had her choice of places to work, she would want to be hired by Bear Stearns because it's known for its renegade entrepreneurial bent. Reuters then told the goddess that Bear was no longer in existence, that the former cowboy of Wall Street was acquired by J.P. Morgan a couple years ago. Then I think I would like to work for Lehman Brothers, the goddess said to Reuters, because of their incredible team-oriented culture that I've heard so much about. Reuters then told the goddess that the Brothers went bankrupt a couple years ago for making some extremely bad bets and because its CEO turned out to be not such a great manager. Oh, the goddess said, then I guess I'll work for Merrill Lynch, because I love bulls and I think having the largest retail sales force on Wall Street will be essential to thriving in the investment banking sector during the next two decades.

The Reuters reporter began to respond to the goddess, telling her about Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, a man named Kenny Lewis, another called Thain, a bank known as America and billions of dollars in losses, but was cut short and ushered out of the palace by the goddess' mother, who said it was time for her daughter's afternoon pooja.

Filed Under: Finance


Should Interning for Free be a Government Issue? Tweet Gigs: Job Postings from Twitter -- 4/08/10

Vault welcomes your views. Please stay on topic and be respectful of other readers. Review our User Guidelines.

blog comments powered by Disqus